Trinidad Carnival

Who is Carnival for?

I cannot help but to think about those who still must suffer the financial burden of being priced out of these two days of freedom by elite Trinbagonians, white tourists, and American and European celebrities of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Sometimes I think about what Carnival would or could look like if it was returned to the everyday people, the ones who could really use two days of freedom. . . .

Justice for Treshun Miller

Justice for Treshun Miller

Imagine parents fighting for justice for the death of their son only to be sued by the District Attorney who let the officer who shot their child walk free. After releasing evidence in my son’s case on social media I was issued a temporary restraining order to stop sharing video. The officer involved that shot my son 5 times got the Tarrant County DA to sue me in civil court. This is our story. . . .

Pruitt-Igoe demolition

Reclaiming Black Saint Louis: Pruitt-Igoe, the People and the Pigs.

Part One and Part Two of the Reclaiming Black Saint Louis series. Every student of urban history, planning and architecture is familiar with the Wendell O. Pruitt Homes (intended for Black people) and William Igoe Apartments (intended for whites), colloquially known as “Pruitt-Igoe”. This long demolished community, which occupied the area bounded by 20th Street, Carr Street, Jefferson Avenue and Cass Avenue, is used as a warning against the hubris of bourgeois city planners, urban renewal hacks, and other wannabe do-gooders who end up fucking up more than they fix. Pruitt-Igoe was the product of the Eisenhower and Truman era, . . .

Are Reparations Worth Selling Out Black Women?

Ajowa Ifateyo: Speaking UPFRONT  Originally published November 1984   Ajowa Ifateyo worked from 1972 to 1980 as editor of The Burning Spear, the newspaper of the African People’s Socialist Party. In 1980, the party split, as she describes in the interview.  In 1983, Ifateyo was one of a group of women who founded UPFRONT, a national Black women’s quarterly newspaper published out of Washington, D.C. She currently works on its staff.  Off Our Backs staffer, Carol Anne Douglas; (who is white) interviewed Ajowa Ifateyo. The interview discusses part of her experience in the APSP and her ideas on Black women’s . . .

Reclaiming Black Saint Louis Part II: Mill Creek Valley: Urban Renewal or Prole Removal?

New Afrikan people live in the midst of a war for our cities. The colonizer bourgeoisie wants us gone so that they can build coffeehouses and million-dollar condos over our corpses. So it’s no wonder that we reach for our pistols whenever we hear talk of “Urban Renewal”. On our end, this term translates to “population removal”. Mill Creek Valley was a thriving New Afrikan community, nearly two centuries old in the mid-1950s. Saint Louis was home to thriving ethnic neighborhoods at a point in our history. We had the Irish in Kerry Patch, Germans in Baden, and New Afrikans . . .

Black is Crime: Notes on Blaqillegalism

“As long as I’m alive I’ma live illegal, and once I get on I’ma put on all my people” -Prodigy “The fugitive nature of Blackness, the inherent outlawing of our bodies by the state and our positionality as being already outside of the law, gives rise to a Black illegalism where extralegal activities to further our survival are foregrounded.” – Anarkata: A Statement What a crime it is to be Black. To have the police be called on you for sitting in a restaurant, for grilling at a cookout, selling water, going to the pool, taking a nap, standing on . . .

Reclaiming Black Saint Louis Part 1: Kinloch: The Lost City

For the month of February 2020, I will dedicate myself to researching and writing on the history of New Afrikan people in my city, our struggles, and triumphs, our defeats and victories. Knowledge of history is important because it is what shapes our present. Why does the Delmar Divide exist? Why is the life expectancy of our people cut short in North STL? Why was there very little rioting in STL after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968? These questions and more I will be investigating all throughout this month and this series I hope will be . . .

Reenvisioning Harm Reduction As Reparations

Last year marked the 400th anniversary of the commencement of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in North America.  As politicians and others began announcing their plans to run for President, reparations once again became a prominent mainstream talking point. Subsequently, a historic hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee in Washington DC, on the question of reparations, coincided with Juneteenth.  The intent of the hearing was not to determine reparations but, instead, determine if the H.R. 40 bill, a bill to convene a commission to study, document, quantify and make recommendations for reparations, should move forward. For over a century, despite . . .