Protests against US Sanctions in Zimbabwe

Sanctions Kill: The Devastating Human Cost of Sanctions

Sanctions don’t defend justice or human rights. They are an illegal, immoral, and terrorist act of war, applied against civilians, and inflicting the greatest suffering on the most vulnerable, including children, pregnant women, the ill, elderly, and disabled. . . .

Pruitt-Igoe demolition

Reclaiming Black Saint Louis: Pruitt-Igoe, the People and the Pigs.

Part One and Part Two of the Reclaiming Black Saint Louis series. Every student of urban history, planning and architecture is familiar with the Wendell O. Pruitt Homes (intended for Black people) and William Igoe Apartments (intended for whites), colloquially known as “Pruitt-Igoe”. This long demolished community, which occupied the area bounded by 20th Street, Carr Street, Jefferson Avenue and Cass Avenue, is used as a warning against the hubris of bourgeois city planners, urban renewal hacks, and other wannabe do-gooders who end up fucking up more than they fix. Pruitt-Igoe was the product of the Eisenhower and Truman era, . . .

Reclaiming Black Saint Louis Part II: Mill Creek Valley: Urban Renewal or Prole Removal?

New Afrikan people live in the midst of a war for our cities. The colonizer bourgeoisie wants us gone so that they can build coffeehouses and million-dollar condos over our corpses. So it’s no wonder that we reach for our pistols whenever we hear talk of “Urban Renewal”. On our end, this term translates to “population removal”. Mill Creek Valley was a thriving New Afrikan community, nearly two centuries old in the mid-1950s. Saint Louis was home to thriving ethnic neighborhoods at a point in our history. We had the Irish in Kerry Patch, Germans in Baden, and New Afrikans . . .

Reclaiming Black Saint Louis Part 1: Kinloch: The Lost City

For the month of February 2020, I will dedicate myself to researching and writing on the history of New Afrikan people in my city, our struggles, and triumphs, our defeats and victories. Knowledge of history is important because it is what shapes our present. Why does the Delmar Divide exist? Why is the life expectancy of our people cut short in North STL? Why was there very little rioting in STL after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968? These questions and more I will be investigating all throughout this month and this series I hope will be . . .

Reenvisioning Harm Reduction As Reparations

Last year marked the 400th anniversary of the commencement of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in North America.  As politicians and others began announcing their plans to run for President, reparations once again became a prominent mainstream talking point. Subsequently, a historic hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee in Washington DC, on the question of reparations, coincided with Juneteenth.  The intent of the hearing was not to determine reparations but, instead, determine if the H.R. 40 bill, a bill to convene a commission to study, document, quantify and make recommendations for reparations, should move forward. For over a century, despite . . .

How White Nationalism Put You in Student Loan Debt

Yes, it is economics, you’re right, but in the US how they are able to get you to vote against yourself is racism (well white people). After the Civil Rights’ Movement Black and Latino people started making real progress in higher education. From 1970 to 1980 college graduation rates for both groups almost doubled. Enrollment peaked in 1980 and then began to fall. During the mid 1980s, there was a huge decrease in federal dollars utilized to support college students. This was a 180 degree change in policy when compared to the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s and the govt provided . . .

Perspectives on Veterans Day and the War on New Afrika

There was no war bloodier or more destructive in the history of mankind than World World One. So, on June 4th, 1926, following many nations agreeing that such devastation can never happen again, the United States Congress passed a resolution establishing November 11th as Armistice Day. The intent of Armistice Day was to highlight the “day the fighting stopped” (in 1918) and, as President Calvin Coolridge stated in his Proclamation, to “commemorate with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through goodwill and mutual understanding between nations”. However, following World War II, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued a . . .

Memorial marks site of Greensboro Massacre

Revolutionary History: The Greensboro Massacre At 40

Forty years ago on November 3, 1979, five comrades from the Communist Workers’ Party (previously known as Workers’ Viewpoint Organization) went out to demonstrate against the Ku Klux Klan at Greensboro, North Carolina. They would never return home again. César Cauce was a Cuban who graduated with highest honors from Duke University. James Waller was a member of the Central Committee of the CWP, a physician who left his practice to serve the people. Sandra Neely Smith, the only New Afrikan victim, was a well known Civil Rights organizer and founder of the Youth Organization for Black Unity. Michael Nathan . . .