Ellen, Amber and Reclaiming Forgiveness

By: Danielle Butler In response to mounting criticism over being seen at a Dallas Cowboys game sitting alongside former President George W. Bush, daytime talk show juggernaut Ellen DeGeneres defended her friendship with Bush in a 4 minute monologue on her show directed at the wave of disapproval expressed on Twitter. Staring earnestly into the camera, DeGeneres asserted “Here’s the thing. I’m friends with George Bush” she said, “In fact I’m friends with a lot of people who don’t share the same beliefs that I have.” After citing an example of her being able to befriend people who wear fur, . . .

Unpacking The Super Exploitation of Black Women

“Although we are in essential agreement with Marx’s theory as it applied to the very specific economic relationships he analyzed, we know that his analysis must be extended further in order for us to understand our specific economic situation as Black women.” —the Combahee River Collective Statement, 1977 “The concept of the simultaneity of oppression is still the crux of a Black feminist understanding of political reality and, I believe, one of the most significant ideological contributions of Black feminist thought.” —Black feminist and scholar Barbara Smith, 1983 The situational systematic position of Black women, particularly in the US, has . . .

Protests in Haiti

Prospects for the Haitian Revolution

By: Erica Caines and Christopher Winston Last Thursday, US Rep Fredricka Wilson (D- Miami) organized a roundtable discussion between US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and some of South Florida’s most prominent Haitian Americans. In the meeting, Haitain Americans reps minced no words when addressing Pelosi over the current situation in Haiti— The US needs to stop meddling in Haiti’s internal affairs.  “The people of Haiti are saying, ‘My goodness, let us govern ourselves. Let us find our own path… just support us,’” said Gepsie Metellus, the executive director of the social services program, Sant La Haitian Neighborhood Center. “What . . .

A Historical Materialist Analysis of Gender for the Worldwide Pan-African Movement

The Worldwide Pan-African Movement’s  (WWPAM) current line on gender contradictions and the role of women in the struggle is out of date. As a movement, we are in dire need of an update in our analysis around these questions if we are serious about the struggle against patriarchy and the liberation of women and non-men*. *Non-men means folks who are neither men nor women, but who are still oppressed on the basis of gender under patriarchy and capitalism. This paper seeks to raise and discuss three major contradictions that currently exist within the WWPAM’s generally accepted line on gender, patriarchy, . . .

Concerns and Grievances: The Question of Reparations

A very long list of my concerns and grievances about reparations for African descendants of slavery: 1). We should begin by critiquing an oft-recited argument made by the Right. The standard conservative deflection is that slavery “happened so long ago” and therefore “no one alive is responsible.” This line of reasoning fails to understand the relationship between anti-blackness and time. What we call “time” is, first and foremost, a human invention and social convention. We are led to believe that time always unfolds in a neat and chronological format; one that is labeled ‘beginning-middle-end’ or ‘past-present-future.’ The problem is: black . . .

Kwame Nkrumah giving a speech

Studying Nkrumah

In the development of Student Philosophical Conciousness in both colonial & settler colonial contexts, all African students everywhere can find themselves in these 3 types of students described by Kwame Nkrumah. Which one are you? Lately, I’ve been feeling this ‘personality type’ thing lately. The Feds use these systems a lot, I’m sure. They can be helpful in isolating and articulating probabilities and outcomes. I even developed a travel personality system to help folks planning to travel so they will be able to plan for a great outcome. I use it in my book, The “un”-Official Ghana Travel Guide. I . . .

Colonized Poor and Working Class Leading Is My Mood 4 Eva

Unlike Colonizer “leftist”, us Colonized Revolutionaries find our way to the front lines of the revolution through pain by the parasitic system we know as Colonialism. Colonialism, which is the primary mode of production for this society called the western world, is what we know to be White Power. Colonizer “leftists” find their voice through wanting to sound superior in college debates. We Colonized  Revolutionaries find our voice with tears in our eyes screaming, “We want to stop dying, we want to stop seeing our people murdered by the Colonial Police state”. We come to the front lines of the . . .

The Legacy of George Jackson

“The ultimate expression of law is not order — it’s prison… The law and everything that interlocks with it was constructed for poor desperate people.” –George Jackson If Vladimir Lenin believed that prisons are universities for revolutionaries then George Jackson is the physical embodiment of that belief. While certainly an oppressive state can breed creativity, literary activism is its own form of resistance. In Jackson’s case, he forged a liberation movement from a space of captivity.  Arrested on presumably false charges based on dubious evidence for a $70 robbery at a gas station at age 18, Jackson pled guilty in . . .