Thoughts about “A Maoist Response to China in Africa” Article

On July 31, 2019, I wrote and posted the article “China in Africa; A Critical Assessment” on my blog at “Ahjamu Umi’s the Truth Challenge” at www.abetterworld.me.   Since that time, the “HoodCommunist” blog has launched.  Anyone who knows anything about cadre within the All African People’s Revolutionary Party (A-APRP) knows that we don’t see anyone genuinely fighting for justice as a threat to our work.  We never have and we never will. We operate under the premise that our enemies are the international capitalist/imperialist network led by the United States. I say that to underscore the fact that I welcome, encourage, and support the HoodCommunist blog and everyone else concerned about justice should also.  So, when a good comrade invited me to submit my China piece to HoodCommunist, I didn’t hesitate. After the article was posted to the HoodCommunist blog, Christopher Winston responded with “A Maoist Response” to my . . .

A Maoist Response to “China In Africa: A Critical Assessment”

Socialism is the dictatorship of the proletariat. There can be no other definition. It is not the ownership of property by the state, or social welfare programs, or “lifting people out of poverty”, it is a class dictatorship that consciously and actively transitions towards Communism. If you are not on the Communist road, you are on the capitalist road. Socialism is the long period that is characterized by the active and conscious replacing of old capitalist things with new socialist things, and the defense of these new socialist things. Socialism is the period during which class struggle continues, and when the danger of capitalist restoration is still real. In a 1972 Peking Review article, Chi Ping wrote: “In 1957, Chairman Mao pointed out: “The class enemies will invariably seek opportunities to assert themselves. They will not resign themselves to the loss of state power and of their property. However much . . .

China in Africa: A Critical Assessment

This piece is written specifically for those people who hold a specific interest in African politics, particularly Pan-Africanist movement politics.  We say Pan-African because particularly within the industrialized capitalist countries, Africa is primarily discussed and viewed as an ancillary place with secondary importance to the European Judeo-Christian, capitalist dominated societies across the planet.  For Pan-Africanists – and when we say Pan-Africanists we mean revolutionary Pan-Africanists who are committed to the total liberation and unification of Africa under scientific socialism, a process that will happen only with organized revolutionary struggle – this question of China in Africa is hotly debated, discussed, and assessed.  What we know from these discussions is that the issue is extremely complex with many different moving parts. The objective of this piece is to provide some insight into the reasons for, benefits of, and challenges from China’s political and economic activities in Africa today. The complexity of . . .

Perspectives on Veterans Day and the War on New Afrika

There was no war bloodier or more destructive in the history of mankind than World World One. So, on June 4th, 1926, following many nations agreeing that such devastation can never happen again, the United States Congress passed a resolution establishing November 11th as Armistice Day. The intent of Armistice Day was to highlight the “day the fighting stopped” (in 1918) and, as President Calvin Coolridge stated in his Proclamation, to “commemorate with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through goodwill and mutual understanding between nations”. However, following World War II, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued a Proclamation that changed the designation of November 11th from Armistice Day to Veterans Day. Eisenhower said: “I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly . . .

New Black Face of Canada

Last September, Time Magazine released a provocative yearbook picture of Justin Trudeau, the current Prime Minister of Canada. It was taken at a costume party for teachers college, in Vancouver. He dressed up as Aladdin……. with Black face. My first thought seeing this picture, “Which version of Aladdin is this?” I wasn’t aware of the Jim Crow era of Arabia nights. Before I knew it, media tried to spin this story, calling it “brown face” because he was dressed as an Arab/middle easterner. Since then, he has apologized for his behavior in 2001. He properly recognized his actions as Black face and acknowledged his white privilege. He also admitted to a separate instance in high school when he wore Black face for a performance singing Harry Belafonte’s “Day-o”. Well that’s that right?  Trudeau was right in the middle of washing his white privileged hands of an ignorant past in the . . .

Prospects for the Haitian Revolution

By: Erica Caines and Christopher Winston Last Thursday, US Rep Fredricka Wilson (D- Miami) organized a roundtable discussion between US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and some of South Florida’s most prominent Haitian Americans. In the meeting, Haitain Americans reps minced no words when addressing Pelosi over the current situation in Haiti— The US needs to stop meddling in Haiti’s internal affairs.  “The people of Haiti are saying, ‘My goodness, let us govern ourselves. Let us find our own path… just support us,’” said Gepsie Metellus, the executive director of the social services program, Sant La Haitian Neighborhood Center. “What do people want to see? They want to see the United States ask, ‘What do you want and how can we help you get it?’ We don’t want the United States or Canada or France or the rest of our friends dictating. We don’t want to be dictated to.” While . . .

A Case For Impeachment Has Nothing To Do With Us

While many inside the party branded themselves “the resistance”, there were obvious disagreements on actually resisting. What Waters was (and still is) calling for is a complete removal from office, while Pelosi wanted to use “other alternatives” like subpoenas. At the time, many of the cowards democrats believed an impeachment inquiry would set a bad precedent in the future for Congress. After “The Mueller Report” ended up being the disappointment “the radical left” knew it would be, democrats seemingly went on with business as usual. hat was until whispers of a “troubling” phone call between Trump and another country’s leader made its rounds. . . .

African Solidarity with the Cuban Revolution

Fourteen days ago I was in Cuba, one of 160ish people there for the Venceremos Brigade – a solidarity delegation celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The VB was started half a century ago, a first of its kind internationalist mission created by youth living and struggling in the United States who wanted to show their solidarity with the Cuban Revolution. The Brigade has shown up in many sizes and forms over the years but at its core it remains about people to people anti-imperialist solidarity in direct action form. The VB is an act of collective support for Cuba’s right to self-determination and an act of collective defiance against limitations on the free movement of US citizens and the devastating blockade that has stolen billions of dollars from the Cuban economy over the course of generations. In short the Venceremos Brigade is about acting in solidarity with Cuba, learning . . .

Trinidad and Tobago’s independence and the importance of African centered struggles

 So much of who I am is blended into the rich colors of red, Black and white, is moved through a calypso tune and horns, steel drums and chipping on the road, is a reflection of spices and pepper sauce. As the US born daughter of two Trinis, one who loved politics and one who loves bacchanal, my identity has always been twofold, like many Black people who reside within the US.  Trinidad and Tobago’s “Together We Aspire, Together We Achieve” motto means “the hope of a people for a better life to be achieved through cooperation and working together to build a better nation”. The twin isles also happen to be the birthplace of Black Radicals such as Claudia Jones, Kwame Ture, and Darcus Howe, all of whom embraced African centered internationalist politics.  Because these aforementioned Black Radicals left Trinidad and became symbolic figures in movements towards Black liberation . . .