Rasmea Odeh and Angela Davis - African solidarity against Zionism

How African People Became the Face of Anti-Semitism

Article By Ahjamu Umi & Onyesonwu Chatoyer Zionism as a Political Movement  First, in order for anyone to fully comprehend the contradictions that the Zionist movement presents, its essential for us to understand the difference between Zionism – a political movement – and Judaism, a faith practice.  Judaism as a religion is, of course, one of the oldest forms of organized political practice known to human civilization.  Without question, Judaism has its roots either directly in being founded in Africa, or at the very least, being nurtured and developed in Africa.  It is a spiritual faith practiced by millions that . . .

The Compensation is Freedom

Capitalism preys on revolutionary strategy. It eats Black culture for breakfast. It siphons organic energy from the impetus of movement workers. In the 21st century, the Non-Profit Industrial Complex is its primary agent in this pursuit. That the NPIC monopolizes movement resources is accepted quite unanimously throughout radical, Black spaces. And, yet, there is a conspicuous lack of acknowledgment of Black complicity in this phenomenon. Black movement workers regard their own relationship to nonprofit malpractice as inevitable or as minimally harmful given the choices they are faced in navigating a capitalist, racialized society. The Black movement worker’s role in commercializing . . .

International Anti-Imperialist Cumbe of African and Afro-Descendent People

The following resolution was developed and voted upon by African delegates from the continent and the diaspora at the World Conference Against Imperialism held in Caracas, Venezuela from January 22- 24, 2020 STRUCTURE  From Venezuela, a country on the anti-imperialist offensive and resistance to the multiple aggressions of U.S. imperialism, in accordance with the agreements of the 25th Sao Paulo Forum, held in July 2019, the International Afro-descendant Congress was held in November of the same year, as part of the 248th anniversary of the assassination of the Afro-Venezuelan Cimarron Guillermo Ribas, leader of the Cumbe de Ocoyta (1768-1771), a . . .

Final Declaration of the World Conference Against Imperialism – Caracas, Venezuela

The following statements were produced at the World Conference Against Imperialism held in Caracas, Venezuela from January 22- 24, 2020 The delegations of the Political Parties and Social Movements, gathered in the city of Caracas, capital of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, on the occasion of the “World Meeting against Imperialism”, after the deliberations we have reached the following conclusions:  The future of humanity is in grave danger. Peace on the planet is seriously threatened as a result of the military aggression policy of the US and its allies, as well as the deadly arms race that brings only dividends to large corporations in the military . . .

Final Declaration of the Afro- Descendant International Congress

Final Declaration of the Afro- Descendant International Congress

The following resolutions were approved by the Afro-descendant International Congress, in the City of Caracas, Cradle of the Liberator Simón Bolívar and Capital of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela on November 12, 2019. We, Afro-descendants of Our America, and Africans, gathered in the city of Caracas, capital of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, on the occasion of the Afro-descendant International Congress, in accordance with what was agreed in the framework of the 25th Meeting of the Sao Paulo Forum and in the framework of the commemoration of the 248th anniversary of the assassination of the Afro-Venezuelan Cimarron “Guillermo Ribas,” leader . . .

Black Capitalism is a Lie

#BlackLivesMatter needs a class analysis alongside its race analysis. Nothing has driven this home more to me than being in Ghana and seeing African owned shops, African owned banks, African owned corporations, African judges, African police, and an African president and yet the masses of people there are still poor, still struggling, and still exploited and oppressed. It’s extremely common in Accra to see huge, huge houses with humming generators behind six foot high walls topped with broken glass and barbed wire, houses owned by wealthy Africans. Next to this ostentatious wealth you’ll see rows upon rows of reclaimed shipping . . .

Trinidad and Tobago’s independence and the importance of African centered struggles

 So much of who I am is blended into the rich colors of red, Black and white, is moved through a calypso tune and horns, steel drums and chipping on the road, is a reflection of spices and pepper sauce. As the US born daughter of two Trinis, one who loved politics and one who loves bacchanal, my identity has always been twofold, like many Black people who reside within the US.  Trinidad and Tobago’s “Together We Aspire, Together We Achieve” motto means “the hope of a people for a better life to be achieved through cooperation and working together . . .

The Legacy of George Jackson

“The ultimate expression of law is not order — it’s prison… The law and everything that interlocks with it was constructed for poor desperate people.” –George Jackson If Vladimir Lenin believed that prisons are universities for revolutionaries then George Jackson is the physical embodiment of that belief. While certainly an oppressive state can breed creativity, literary activism is its own form of resistance. In Jackson’s case, he forged a liberation movement from a space of captivity.  Arrested on presumably false charges based on dubious evidence for a $70 robbery at a gas station at age 18, Jackson pled guilty in . . .