Why Juneteenth has a Focus Denied to African Liberation Day

This past weekend, the concept of Juneteenth was discussed and celebrated all throughout the U.S.  Spurred by consciousness brought about by people in the streets protesting police terrorism against the African masses, Juneteenth serves as a pressure point for supporting the history of our resistance against oppression.  For anyone who hasn’t figured it out yet, Juneteenth is the commemoration of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation which ended slavery in the U.S. in 1863.  Due to the corrupt and oppressive nature of chattel slavery as an institution, the slaver masters in Galveston, Texas, U.S., didn’t even bother to tell the . . .

“BLACK ALLIANCE FOR PEACE: Rise Up to Shut Down AFRICOM”

Fifty-seven years since the founding of African Liberation Day (ALD), the pressing need for African unity is more apparent than ever. The Black Alliance for Peace (BAP) recognizes the crucial role of ALD in revitalizing internationalism and anti-imperialism as the bedrock of a reconstituted Black liberation project committed to an authentic process of decolonization. Globally, the African working class is locked in mortal combat against the forces of neoliberal capitalism, which is concentrated in the geostrategic interests of the U.S. ruling classes. To preserve these interests, the U.S. is involved in an aggressive military re-conquest of Africa through its United . . .

Recentering Internationalism: An Analysis of Economic Sanctions

As maintained in the October article, Failures of the US Left, “what should be largely understood by the ‘US left’ is that fascism and capitalism rely on and support imperialism—- seeking out to exploit nations we’ve come to view as Underdeveloped for labor, benefiting only the most privileged few within the Western nation”. During this year’s African Liberation Day virtual broadcast, this point was exemplified through discussions centered on imperialist sanctions against sovereign nations like Zimbabwe, Cuba, and Venezuela, reiterating the point that “one can not be a revolutionary socialist and not also be an anti-imperialist.” How does one come . . .