To HWS: an Open Letter of Resignation

For my own sanity and overall well-being, I will not be returning to Hobart and William Smith Colleges this fall as an enrolled student. I have not absolved myself from accountability. By providing context for my actions, I seek to expand the scope of what needs to be accounted for.  It had only taken me half of my first semester to learn that racism at HWS was silent and coded most of the time and grotesquely blatant at other times. During that semester, I was confronted by peers with similar critiques of the institution who wanted to speak out against the inequities they themselves had experienced but requested assistance with language. I suggested the name We, The Unheard for our demonstration, wanting to convey the urgency of being made to feel nearly voiceless and to make an attempt to establish (what would be hundreds of) demonstrators as a diverse community . . .

How White Nationalism Put You in Student Loan Debt

Yes, it is economics, you’re right, but in the US how they are able to get you to vote against yourself is racism (well white people). After the Civil Rights’ Movement Black and Latino people started making real progress in higher education. From 1970 to 1980 college graduation rates for both groups almost doubled. Enrollment peaked in 1980 and then began to fall. During the mid 1980s, there was a huge decrease in federal dollars utilized to support college students. This was a 180 degree change in policy when compared to the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s and the govt provided financial assistance (meaning tuition wasn’t a mortgage payment, because the feds thought it was worth subsidizing) to anyone who wanted to go to college, so what happened?! In 1980 Reagan became President and along with his education Czar William Bennett decided everyone wasn’t going to college. The idea of Black . . .

Thanksgiving and the African Revolutionary

Well, it’s that time of the year, comrades when we are gravitated by guilt back towards our family for the Colonizer’s Holiday Season. The first Holiday is Thanksgiving, where the resources of the working class are pocketed by farmers and airlines.  Thanksgiving has a special place in the hearts of Colonized Revolutionaries. It either speaks to a time where you witnessed a family member exposing the colonial holiday for its brutal genocidal nature or you were that family member that did the exposing. I remember I learned about the natives being the first people of this land in first grade. No matter how nice my teacher tried to make the story about them three ships sound, I was very clear on who the bad guys and good guys were. I made an announcement on that Thanksgiving how disgusted I was by this story.  We should all know by now that . . .

The Futility and Stupidity of the Unrestricted Settler “Left”

As readers may know, I have been a supporter, propagandist and active participant in the For the People movement since its inception. I am but one of many comrades who have dedicated our lives to building a broad movement of working class and nationally oppressed people to finally take down capitalism-imperialism once and for all. One of the requirements for such a movement is the development of alternative infrastructure for the inevitability of services and food transport being disrupted in a revolutionary situation. The line of march for the revolution to destroy the United States is the construction and conquest of urban bases and FTP organizations under the leadership of the MCP-OC (Maoist Communist Party – Organizing Committee) are a key part of this task. Skill shares, food shares, and urban agriculture are part and parcel of this strategy.  So, when our community garden was attacked by settler dogmatists calling . . .

Revolutionary History: The Greensboro Massacre At 40

Forty years ago on November 3, 1979, five comrades from the Communist Workers’ Party (previously known as Workers’ Viewpoint Organization) went out to demonstrate against the Ku Klux Klan at Greensboro, North Carolina. They would never return home again. César Cauce was a Cuban who graduated with highest honors from Duke University. James Waller was a member of the Central Committee of the CWP, a physician who left his practice to serve the people. Sandra Neely Smith, the only New Afrikan victim, was a well known Civil Rights organizer and founder of the Youth Organization for Black Unity. Michael Nathan was chief of pediatrics at Lincoln Community Health Center, a revolutionary physician, and extremely active in organizing medical support for revolutionaries in Zimbabwe (aka “Rhodesia”) who were fighting the fascist, settler colonial regime of Ian Smith. William Sampson was president of White Oak Organizing Committee and a graduate of Harvard . . .