Thoughts about “A Maoist Response to China in Africa” Article

On July 31, 2019, I wrote and posted the article “China in Africa; A Critical Assessment” on my blog at “Ahjamu Umi’s the Truth Challenge” at www.abetterworld.me.   Since that time, the “HoodCommunist” blog has launched.  Anyone who knows anything about cadre within the All African People’s Revolutionary Party (A-APRP) knows that we don’t see anyone genuinely fighting for justice as a threat to our work.  We never have and we never will. We operate under the premise that our enemies are the international capitalist/imperialist network led by the United States. I say that to underscore the fact that I welcome, encourage, and support the HoodCommunist blog and everyone else concerned about justice should also.  So, when a good comrade invited me to submit my China piece to HoodCommunist, I didn’t hesitate. After the article was posted to the HoodCommunist blog, Christopher Winston responded with “A Maoist Response” to my . . .

China in Africa: A Critical Assessment

This piece is written specifically for those people who hold a specific interest in African politics, particularly Pan-Africanist movement politics.  We say Pan-African because particularly within the industrialized capitalist countries, Africa is primarily discussed and viewed as an ancillary place with secondary importance to the European Judeo-Christian, capitalist dominated societies across the planet.  For Pan-Africanists – and when we say Pan-Africanists we mean revolutionary Pan-Africanists who are committed to the total liberation and unification of Africa under scientific socialism, a process that will happen only with organized revolutionary struggle – this question of China in Africa is hotly debated, discussed, and assessed.  What we know from these discussions is that the issue is extremely complex with many different moving parts. The objective of this piece is to provide some insight into the reasons for, benefits of, and challenges from China’s political and economic activities in Africa today. The complexity of . . .

What is Revolutionary Pan-Africanism?

I feel compelled to write this because I recently listened to a presenter at a conference – in Africa no less – describe Pan-Africanism as “resistance and defiance.” I was like bruh what? Certainly the revolutionary political tendencies from which Pan-Africanism developed could be accurately be described as defiant. And certainly Pan-Africanism as a strategy and an ideology is uncompromising in it’s resistance to colonialism, imperialism, and capitalism. However, stopping at such nebulous and emotion-driven descriptors and neglecting to mention clear history when describing Pan-Africanism only serves the purpose of obscuring clear, world-changing – and as yet unmet – political objectives. Because that is what Pan-Africanism is – a political objective: the total liberation and political unification of the entire African continent under scientific socialism. It is a revolutionary response to the dispossession, exploitation, and attempted genocide of African people everywhere. It is Africa’s contribution to the struggle for the . . .

Consciencism, an African World View: Studies in Quantum Philosophical Thought

The word Consciencism was coined by President Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana and Co-President of Guinea, in a small book named, ‘Consciencism, Philosophy and Ideology of Decolonization’, first published in 1964. The word Consciencism is a construct of the word conscience and the suffix ism. For our purposes, the root word, conscience, can be defined as, ‘the capacity and urge to distinguish right from wrong as a guide to human activity’. The suffix ism, in this instance is, ‘the theory, practice and philosophy of that to which it pertains’. Accordingly, Consciencism is, “The theory, practice and philosophy of distinguishing right from wrong as a guide to human action.”             As stated in the title of Nkrumah’s book, Consciencism is both philosophy and ideology. As philosophy it explains the world and the principles that govern it. As ideology it directs our actions towards our collective political, economic and social objectives.              For . . .

Black Capitalism is a Lie

#BlackLivesMatter needs a class analysis alongside its race analysis. Nothing has driven this home more to me than being in Ghana and seeing African owned shops, African owned banks, African owned corporations, African judges, African police, and an African president and yet the masses of people there are still poor, still struggling, and still exploited and oppressed. It’s extremely common in Accra to see huge, huge houses with humming generators behind six foot high walls topped with broken glass and barbed wire, houses owned by wealthy Africans. Next to this ostentatious wealth you’ll see rows upon rows of reclaimed shipping containers turned into homes, or concrete huts with sheet metal roofs, often without running water or consistent electricity, housing families of four, five, or more poor Africans. What does this obvious inequality tell you? If the solution to African oppression in the US is just more and better integration, more . . .

Prospects for the Haitian Revolution

By: Erica Caines and Christopher Winston Last Thursday, US Rep Fredricka Wilson (D- Miami) organized a roundtable discussion between US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and some of South Florida’s most prominent Haitian Americans. In the meeting, Haitain Americans reps minced no words when addressing Pelosi over the current situation in Haiti— The US needs to stop meddling in Haiti’s internal affairs.  “The people of Haiti are saying, ‘My goodness, let us govern ourselves. Let us find our own path… just support us,’” said Gepsie Metellus, the executive director of the social services program, Sant La Haitian Neighborhood Center. “What do people want to see? They want to see the United States ask, ‘What do you want and how can we help you get it?’ We don’t want the United States or Canada or France or the rest of our friends dictating. We don’t want to be dictated to.” While . . .

A Historical Materialist Analysis of Gender for the Worldwide Pan-African Movement

The Worldwide Pan-African Movement’s  (WWPAM) current line on gender contradictions and the role of women in the struggle is out of date. As a movement, we are in dire need of an update in our analysis around these questions if we are serious about the struggle against patriarchy and the liberation of women and non-men*. *Non-men means folks who are neither men nor women, but who are still oppressed on the basis of gender under patriarchy and capitalism. This paper seeks to raise and discuss three major contradictions that currently exist within the WWPAM’s generally accepted line on gender, patriarchy, and the role of women: The masses of Africans people are divided into two genders – man and woman – based on biology. The primary role of women in the revolution centers around our ability to reproduce and our traditional role of raising and caring for children. The general silence . . .

Umar’s FDMG Academy and The Legacy of Pan-Afrikanism

Umar Johnson has reached a pivotal point on how his legacy will be written down in history books. There are only 3 possibilities when it comes to his long time, crowd funded FDMG (Frederick Douglas – Marcus Garvey) Academy for boys. He’ll either succeed, fail, or bamboozle us all. This is not a piece analyzing the viability of his school. This piece is a response to the announcement of the acquisition of the property. A lot of people, mainly his supporters are in high hopes that this will advance the liberation movement. Johnson is the self proclaimed “Prince of Pan-Afrikanism” He has been on notable platforms like Breakfast Club and DJ Vlad. He travels the world to give speeches and lectures. New people opening up their consciousness to Black liberation will embrace him for his gift of gab. The average person not schooled in political education will attribute Johnson to . . .

African Solidarity with the Cuban Revolution

Fourteen days ago I was in Cuba, one of 160ish people there for the Venceremos Brigade – a solidarity delegation celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The VB was started half a century ago, a first of its kind internationalist mission created by youth living and struggling in the United States who wanted to show their solidarity with the Cuban Revolution. The Brigade has shown up in many sizes and forms over the years but at its core it remains about people to people anti-imperialist solidarity in direct action form. The VB is an act of collective support for Cuba’s right to self-determination and an act of collective defiance against limitations on the free movement of US citizens and the devastating blockade that has stolen billions of dollars from the Cuban economy over the course of generations. In short the Venceremos Brigade is about acting in solidarity with Cuba, learning . . .

Studying Nkrumah

In the development of Student Philosophical Conciousness in both colonial & settler colonial contexts, all African students everywhere can find themselves in these 3 types of students described by Kwame Nkrumah. Which one are you? Lately, I’ve been feeling this ‘personality type’ thing lately. The Feds use these systems a lot, I’m sure. They can be helpful in isolating and articulating probabilities and outcomes. I even developed a travel personality system to help folks planning to travel so they will be able to plan for a great outcome. I use it in my book, The “un”-Official Ghana Travel Guide. I came across another personality type system while reading Consciencism by Kwame Nkrumah. Nkrumah describes 3 types of students. Student Type #1 The first is star struck by colonial education as a result of being immersed in it from an early age-they are fully internally indoctrinated by the time they finish . . .