Atlantan Wakandism: Why Black Capitalism must be Challenged

The Black Bourgeoisie class  sells the idea of Atlanta as being some sort of mythological negro-town, where all your dreams come true and you will be safe from poverty and downward mobility caused by capitalist stratification. The smoke and mirrors of a Black paradise that they offer is what I call Wakandism. It is a belief that a place where some Black people have success offers a model to be followed while ignoring the struggle of Atlanta’s predominantly Black working class. . Most often wakandism is applied to Atlanta as an outlier for the United States since a Black capitalist . . .

P Diddy, Jay Z, and TI

The African (Black) Petti-Bourgeoisie has Always Been a Problem

Its critical that we as African people understand that the African petti-bourgeoisie will always choose their class interests over the interests of the masses of African people. . . .

Democratic Party vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris waves in front of a red, white, and blue backdrop.

Intersectionality only works for Sellouts! We must throw it to the Sea!

As an African Non-Binary Queer Differently-Abled Person who is the child of immigrants, I initially gravitated towards the theory of Intersectionality. But I soon realized that underneath the mask, what is being called intersectional feminism is just white feminism with artificial flavoring. . . .

Aren’t We Tired Of The Obamas Yet?

One of the biggest issues with perceived notions of Black excellence is the ways it is contributed to uncritical perceived notions of success. There is an avoidance in acknowledging that “Black excellence” is rooted in a colonial narrative of what makes someone exceptional. Circumstantially, that perception is determined by what we deem “success”. The contradictions of Black excellence is most evident in the romanticizing of The Obamas.  Barack Obama’s 8-year presidency has been a surface level achievement for the Black community based on identity reductionism. After all, he is the FIRST Black president. But a closer inspection of those 8 . . .