Dedan Kimathi, African Revolutionary Leader of the Kenyan Land and Freedom Army

Dedan Kimathi Day: A Reportback from Kenya

Dedan Kimathi was the chief and commander of the Kenyan Land and Freedom Army (KFLA) which also known by the settler given name, “Mau Mau.” . . .

Are Reparations Worth Selling Out Black Women?

Ajowa Ifateyo: Speaking UPFRONT  Originally published November 1984   Ajowa Ifateyo worked from 1972 to 1980 as editor of The Burning Spear, the newspaper of the African People’s Socialist Party. In 1980, the party split, as she describes in the interview.  In 1983, Ifateyo was one of a group of women who founded UPFRONT, a national Black women’s quarterly newspaper published out of Washington, D.C. She currently works on its staff.  Off Our Backs staffer, Carol Anne Douglas; (who is white) interviewed Ajowa Ifateyo. The interview discusses part of her experience in the APSP and her ideas on Black women’s . . .

Black is Crime: Notes on Blaqillegalism

“As long as I’m alive I’ma live illegal, and once I get on I’ma put on all my people” -Prodigy “The fugitive nature of Blackness, the inherent outlawing of our bodies by the state and our positionality as being already outside of the law, gives rise to a Black illegalism where extralegal activities to further our survival are foregrounded.” – Anarkata: A Statement What a crime it is to be Black. To have the police be called on you for sitting in a restaurant, for grilling at a cookout, selling water, going to the pool, taking a nap, standing on . . .

Reclaiming Black Saint Louis Part 1: Kinloch: The Lost City

For the month of February 2020, I will dedicate myself to researching and writing on the history of New Afrikan people in my city, our struggles, and triumphs, our defeats and victories. Knowledge of history is important because it is what shapes our present. Why does the Delmar Divide exist? Why is the life expectancy of our people cut short in North STL? Why was there very little rioting in STL after the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968? These questions and more I will be investigating all throughout this month and this series I hope will be . . .

Qassem Soleimani isn’t a Terrorist, America is.

I always see this barrage of tweets coming from Black twitter whenever some white devil decides to do a mass murder of colonized people. Colonized people online then march to their keyboard to tweet “Why isn’t he being called a terrorist.”  As Colonized people, we are very confused about the world we see. This is because we have some kind of faith in this system and believe that at its core it means well. This type of foolishness will always lead you to foolish outcomes. The reason why the white man that shoots up a mosque isn’t called a terrorist . . .

Against New Liberia: Class Remains The Key Link

There has been much confusion regarding the character, purpose, and benefit of projects in Africa such as those launched by multimillionaire musical artist Akon in Senegal. This project is described by the New York Post as being “run entirely on renewable energy” and Akon himself is quoted as saying: “With the AKoin we are building cities, the first one being in Senegal…we’re securing the land and closing out all the legislation papers for the city. We want to make it a free zone and cryptocurrency-driven as a test market.” Essentially, this is a capitalist project. This is an old strategy, . . .

The Communionist Manifesto

“…imperialism negates itself after laying the foundation for communism, and communism will eventually negate itself because of its internal contradictions, and then we will move to an even higher state. So of course there will be contradictions in the future. But some contradictions are antagonistic and some contradictions are not antagonistic.”-Huey P. Newton “First, I rejected their materialistic interpretation of history. Communism, avowedly secularistic and materialistic, has no place for God. Humans are not and have never been one-dimensional, class-based, economic creatures… …What I’m saying to you this morning is communism forgets that life is individual. Capitalism forgets that life . . .

Ayiti

Whenever Haiti is the topic of discussion, one will always think and associate Haiti as being the “poorest country in the Western Hemisphere” and as the country who always seems to be in political turmoil. We are also reminded of the devastating earthquake that rocked Haiti 10 years ago and how the US and France, two of the many countries who are responsible for Haiti’s current state, came to aid Haiti as the “poverty-stricken” and “helpless” sibling that media has portrayed Haiti to be since the 80s. As a child of Haitian immigrants, hearing about Haiti’s troubles has always caused . . .