Photo of Affiong L. Affiong on the Liberation Archives template with text that reads "DINNER AT THE OBAMA INN"

Dining at the Obama Inn

ON 17 MAY, THE VENERABLE New York Times reported: “Mr. Obama will travel to Accra, the capital of Ghana, on July 10 for an overnight stop at the end of a trip that will first take him to Moscow to meet with Russian leaders and then Sardinia for the annual summit of the G8 powers. The president and Mrs. Obama look forward to strengthening the US relationship with one of our most trusted partners in sub-Saharan Africa, and to highlighting the critical role that sound governance and civil society play in promoting lasting development …” Yes, Obama-ists around the globe . . .

From left to right: Black musicians Paul Robeson, Billie Holiday and Tupac Shakur

A Short History of the US War Against Black Musicians

Introduction  The polarizing nature of the Black Power Movement captured the attention of the entire nation. The revolutionary rhetoric espoused by prominent Black organizations and activists also earned the full attention of intelligence agencies in the United States hell-bent on quelling any support of socialist economic practices at the height of the Cold War. Covert operations like the FBI’s infamous Counterintelligence Program (COINTELPRO) identified, surveilled, defamed, and often murdered Black leaders they deemed capable of leading an organized rebellion against the US government. The rise of radical organizations like the Black Panther Party produced a counterculture that encouraged cultural pride . . .

Image of aftermath of shooting in Buffalo above an image of various flags of white supremacy in Ukraine

Buffalo Solidifies the Consensus of White Supremacy

The latest mass shooter in Buffalo, New York was clearly a racist and identified with Ukrainian and other neo-Nazis. But white supremacy has a stronger hold on European and U.S. society than is commonly acknowledged. The avowed racist is not the only problem. Originally published in Black Agenda Report. The incidents of mindless, mass carnage in the United States have become so routine that they do not even make national headlines unless the incident has a potential attention-grabbing twist. One of those dramatic twists is when the victims of a mass shooting are from a common social identity and the . . .

Founders of Black Lives Matter, Patrisse Cullors, Melinda Abdullah and Alicia Garza sit around a decadent brunch styled table to reflect on the state of the movement on the anniversary of the murder of George Floyd.

BLM, Patrisse Cullors & Others Who Leave The Train

Editors Note: In recent months, mainstream media has flooded our screens and timelines with breaking news reporting about the misgivings of Patrisse Cullors and the Black Lives Matter national organization. The reporting is salacious and sensational, appealing to our desires to take down the three we “always” knew were “traitors to our movement.” But in what is becoming a mass hysteria among the US African left, are we learning any lessons? By only focusing on the money and the scandal, and not the ideological contradictions that produced all the individualism, opportunism and dead-end strategy of the past decade, we ensure . . .

Photo of New Afrikans People's Program Organizer with the words "We Organize or We Die" overlaying it

New Afrikans Must Not Lose to Nazis

Saturday’s neo-nazi white supremacist mass shooting serves as a reminder of the war waged against the Black colony aka the oppressed New Afrikans (the New Afrikan Nation) and our need for organizations that are working to free the land from euro-amerikkkan control. Originally published on Medium. On Saturday, May 14th, 2022 in Buffalo, New York, an 18-year-old white nationalist neo-nazi walked into a store and opened fire on a crowd with his assault rifle. In addition to writing a racist manifesto, he live-streamed this attack as a means to get his message of white supremacist violence across to all those . . .

Liberation Archives: On Neocolonialism by Rafiki Morris

On Neo-colonialism

(Excepted from  the book, “WAR: The Blood in Our Eyes” by Rafiki Morris) The enemy, who we seek to defeat,  must be named precisely. Especially since, at this time in history, the enemy is the most sophisticated system of human exploitation that ever existed. The enemy is capitalism and imperialism.  We are told that people don’t understand this capitalism and imperialism, that dominates their lives. But nobody knows capitalism better than those who are exploited and dehumanized by it. The people know and understand the enemy, even when they cannot call them by name. What we must do is to  . . .

A demonstration calling for Joe Biden to cancel all student loan debt

No Half Measures, Cancel All Student Loan Debt

On September 1, 2021, Hurricane Ida hit Southeast Louisiana, temporarily displacing thousands of New Orleans residents, including myself and most of my family. Residents who had the means evacuated early, leaving others to fight for limited resources while simultaneously seeking refuge in neighboring cities. On top of their pre-existing bills, evacuees were forced to front the costs of hotels, food, gas and repairs or even replacement of their own homes. Natural disasters produce an overwhelming amount of stress and anxiety — you simply don’t know if you will have a house to live in until you are able to return home.  I . . .

Southern Workers Gather to Build Worker’s Assembly Movement

Southern Workers Gather to Build Workers Assembly Movement

Under the slogan “Build the Workers Assembly Movement! Organize the South!,” nearly 80 workers from eight Southern states gathered in Durham, North Carolina for a Southern Workers Assembly Organizing School over the weekend of April 29 – May 1. Workers came to the school from Atlanta, New Orleans, Charleston, Tidewater Virginia, Richmond, Charlotte, Raleigh, Durham, Asheville, Eastern North Carolina, northern Kentucky, and elsewhere. Over the last year, the network of areas building workers assemblies across the South has grown substantially to include nine different cities, the development of several industry based councils – including Amazon, healthcare, and education workers – . . .