African, Not American

Although I was born in America, I am certainly not an American because America defined my African ancestors as three-fifths of a human being in their original Constitution. Also, it has been our experience as an African people of the diaspora living in America that the freedom, justice, and equality promised to its citizens in the U.S. Constitution was never intended for us; but for Whites Only. I am a Pan-Africanist Revolutionary. I labor in a Revolutionary Party (All-African People’s Revolutionary Party) founded by Kwame Nkrumah, Ahmed Sekou Toure, and Amilcar Cabral. Stokely Carmichael (aka Kwame Ture) developed into one . . .

Redrawing Aesthetics: Decolonial Theory and the Black Radical Tradition

i have been locked by the lawless. Handcuffed by the haters.  Gagged by the greedy.  And, if i know anything at all, it’s that a wall is just a wall  and nothing more at all. It can be broken down.  i believe in living  i believe in birth. i believe in the sweat of love  and in the fire of truth. –Assata Shakur, “i believe in living.” Opening On the brisk morning of April 1st 2021 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) office in Washington D.C., a protest was on the rise as Indigenous livelihoods, histories, and futures . . .

In Defense of Yoko Ono

“Yoko is as important to me as Paul and Dylan rolled into one. I don’t think she will get recognition until she’s dead. There’s me, and maybe I could count the people on one hand that have any conception of what she is or what her mind is like, or what her work means.” John Lennon In the middle of rolling my wheelchair from one room to another, Yoko Ono suddenly entered my brain. Immediately i began to wonder when i first became familiar with her. Similar to Winnie Mandela, Amy Jacques Garvey, Shirley Graham DuBois or Mama Zondeni Sobukwe, . . .

O.J. Simpson and Imperialism, Sudan, and the Congo

Although he was a prolific professional running back in U.S. football during the 1960s and early 70s, most people today will remember African (Black) Orenthal James (O.J.) Simpson as being either the person who was framed for, or got away with, the June 1994 murders of his European (white) ex-wife Nicole Brown-Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman. I grew up in the same depressed San Francisco, California, U.S. neighborhood as O.J.  As a nine year old child I remember chasing O.J. down in front of Kezar Stadium 1971 for an autograph only to be quickly dismissed for a couple of . . .

Feeling Invisible At an Incognito Show

Leaving New York City and approaching the Lincoln Tunnel, there is a large mural with the old adage, “Nothing Is Impossible.” As i stared into the slight gaudiness of the font and semi-bright paint job, i silently disagreed, as at the moment, everything feels impossible.. It begins with night 1 of 2. As a person who used to skateboard and was heavily into skate culture (and particularly loved the Bones Brigade and folks like Steve Olson) primarily in my teens to early/mid 20s, i was excited to attend a conversation/presentation/Q&A with Rodney Mullen and Tony Hawk. On the day of . . .

Black, Angry and Proud

It’s an all-too-familiar sight in any corporate boardroom in this country. Black, female executives sitting primly and properly wearing artificial modest grins that to the educated eye fail to disguise a rumbling internal volcano fueled by crashing waves of white colleagues’ arrogance, incompetence and stupidity that the sisters dare not address or correct with any degree of passion because in this country passion is considered unacceptable “anger” when Black people display it. Newswise reported: “One barrier to the success of black women in business is the ‘angry black woman’ stereotype, which has long been embedded and perpetuated in American culture . . .