the importance of revolutionary language at the Black People's Survival Conference

The Importance of Revolutionary Language

Organizations and individuals that are guided by Black (Afrikan) revolutionary theory and practices need to be mindful of the language we use — as language is one of the first means by which liberalism attacks. If we are not intentional in aligning our language with revolutionary action and organizing it is liable to be co-opted by the state. Even the most radical of theories such as prison and police abolition can be twisted and watered down by politicians, news outlets, and infiltrators — to the point that they are no longer recognizable. . . .

Huey Newton speaks at Boston college

Huey Newton, George Jackson & What They Mean to Us

This week is quite a historical week as it relates to the African liberation struggle within the confines of the colony known as the U.S. In August of 1971, George Jackson, who was incarcerated in California, was murdered inside prison walls there. As a response to his murder and oppressive prison conditions, incarcerated persons from all walks of life banded together at Attica Prison in New York and staged a rebellion that saw about 40 people slaughtered by prison officials and police. In August of 1989, Huey P. Newton, the co-founder of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, and . . .

Black August, COINTELPRO & Learning The Important Lessons

As 2021 moves along, there are a number of things that, like the sun following the moon, remain constant. The international capitalist system continues to utilize its control over our brain waves to promote, institutionalize, and normalize lies, confusion, and misinformation. The masses of humanity continue to resist this oppression in any number of creative and evolving ways. And, the forces attempting to organize against the system continue to claim complete mastery over how the government manipulated our movements in the past while simultaneously and foolishly behaving in the same destructive ways, especially on social media, that sabotaged our work . . .

In this episode, Mack sits down with revolutionary community organizer Kalonji Changa to discuss the true meaning of Black August.

Kalonji Jama Changa on the Meaning of Black August

  Transcript Erica   “The ultimate expression of law is not order — it’s prison… The law and everything that interlocks with it was constructed for poor desperate people.” –George Jackson Peace Africans! My name is Erica and I’m an editor at hood communist and I want to welcome you to hood communist radio!  State oppression breeds many versions of political activism, but prison activism continues to be a unique  form of resistance. In George Jackson’s case, a liberation movement emerged from a space of captivity. The legacy of George Jackson is felt through the continued resistance of prisoners today who, . . .

Jonathan Jackson, 17, with William Christmas, James McClain and Ruchell Magee take judge, prosecutor, three jurors as hostages to waiting van Aug. 7, 1970

Black August: Fight, Study, Fast, Train

Black August is an African (Black) institution that is commemorated annually to honor the contributions of our African freedom fighters who sacrificed in order to strike blows against the U.S. capitalist empire on behalf of the African masses.  . . .

Editor of Black Agenda Report and ancestor, Glen Ford

Glen Ford— From Elder To Ancestor

“I’m telling you these stories because that is what elders do, we remember things” Glen Ford It is not uncommon to hear that many Africans were introduced to Glen Ford the moment they became ‘activated’ to move away from the democratic party. That introduction often came by way of The Black Agenda Report where Ford (and others) continuously picked apart the insidious and warmongering nature of the neoliberal party. It is no exaggeration to say that BAR set the tone for understanding that both parties are the same. During an 8-year-wave of overwhelming delirium for Barack Obama, Ford’s analysis was . . .

An African women's mobilization for Pan-African Women's Day

Origins and Objectives of Pan-African Women’s Day

Presented by Comrade Debora Soares da Gama, A-APRP Pre-Cadre; militant of the Amilcar Cabral African Youth (JAAC) serving on its Secretariat for Zone 4 of Bissau; and Pre-Cadre of the PAIGC Amilcar Cabral Political Ideological Training School. Origin of Pan-African Women’s Day Pan-African Women’s Day was founded on 31 July 1962, Dar-es-Salaam (Tanganyika), following recommendations of the All African Women’s Conference (AAWC) – Conférence des femmes africaines (CFA). that took place in July 1961, in Conakry, People’s Revolutionary Republic of Guinea. Prior to this conference, it was resolved to organize African Women’s Conferences each areas, (Liberation Movements and Independent African . . .

Kwame Ture in front of an AAPRP banner and a picture of Sekou Toure

Exposing Police Lies to Destroy the Legacy of Kwame Ture

The capitalist system is not going to educate you about the true legacy of Kwame Ture because once you know it, you will become energized to carry out that legacy. The capitalist ruling classes understand clearly, even if we do not, that the day that consciousness takes hold is the day their time is numbered. . . .