Albert Woodfox seated in a kitchen, smiling and holding a copy of his book Solitary.

Albert Woodfox, Angola Three Warrior, passes.

Who has not heard of the Angola Three, three young black prisoners who were falsely accused of killing a prison guard in 1972 in the infamous Louisiana maximum security prison cited at a former slave plantation—and named for the place where the African captives came from, Angola. On Thursday, August 4th, attorneys for Albert Woodfox announced his passing at the age of 75. For over 43 years, Woodfox and several other black men were held in brutal solitary confinement, one of the longest held solitary prisoners on earth: 43 years, seven days a week, 23 hours a day. The United . . .

WERD, which became America's first black-owned radio station in 1949, is now used as a space for Atlanta artists to perform on Wednesday nights.

Black Radio & the Struggle for Pan-Africanism

The 1960’s and 70’s proved itself a paramount time for Black Folks. Not since the beginning of the century with mass organization led by Marcus Garvey, had there been such great instituting towards a better future for Africans globally. In North America there was a rise in Black nationalism and racial pride, ultimately emphasizing the need for Power. Africans in the Caribbean and parts of South America participated in active armed struggles and insurrections against colonial supported governments. They fought strategically to dismantle the systems of economic subjugation that were based upon race. In Europe, Africans held mass demonstrations in . . .

Revolutionary African ancestor, Kwame Ture

Reflections on Kwame Ture

Kwame Ture died at the age of 57 of prostate cancer, by that time Ture’s life story had already become history: the history of Africa, of our age- that of the people’s commitment to the winning of their freedoms. By the end of his life, he had cemented a legacy as a master organizer and staunch Pan-Africanist. As a leader of the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (A-APRP), he helped internationalize the Black freedom struggle and inspired countless young people in the process. . . .

An image of Mukasa Dada with the text: "We Must have an African attitude" - we must take africa back

Mukasa Dada: We Must Take Africa Back

We must take Africa back. We must have an African attitude. We come from Africa. Africa is the richest land in the world full of diamonds and gold and oil and apples and oranges and everything. The people are the most intelligent people in history. We built pyramids. We gave the world mathematics, science and so many deities and gods and what have you. We were an educational voice to the whole world, but we were invaded. We were invaded by the Arabs and we were invaded by the Europeans. They came to Africa and took our diamonds, our gold . . .

Photo of Affiong L. Affiong on the Liberation Archives template with text that reads "DINNER AT THE OBAMA INN"

Dining at the Obama Inn

ON 17 MAY, THE VENERABLE New York Times reported: “Mr. Obama will travel to Accra, the capital of Ghana, on July 10 for an overnight stop at the end of a trip that will first take him to Moscow to meet with Russian leaders and then Sardinia for the annual summit of the G8 powers. The president and Mrs. Obama look forward to strengthening the US relationship with one of our most trusted partners in sub-Saharan Africa, and to highlighting the critical role that sound governance and civil society play in promoting lasting development …” Yes, Obama-ists around the globe . . .

Liberation Archives: On Neocolonialism by Rafiki Morris

On Neo-colonialism

(Excepted from  the book, “WAR: The Blood in Our Eyes” by Rafiki Morris) The enemy, who we seek to defeat,  must be named precisely. Especially since, at this time in history, the enemy is the most sophisticated system of human exploitation that ever existed. The enemy is capitalism and imperialism.  We are told that people don’t understand this capitalism and imperialism, that dominates their lives. But nobody knows capitalism better than those who are exploited and dehumanized by it. The people know and understand the enemy, even when they cannot call them by name. What we must do is to  . . .

From Black Power to Pan-Africanism with Mukasa Dada

From Black Power to Pan-Africanism with Mukasa Dada

Transcript Mukasa Dada, formally known as Willie Ricks, when he was a member of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC – pronounced SNICK), was a frontline organizer who faced naked terror in the 1960s engaging in organizing work against white supremacy. In June of 1966, Mukasa played a pivotal during the “March against Fear” in Mississippi.  Moving away from much of the philosophy of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. which, up to that point, dominated the ideology and actions of the U.S. civil rights movement, SNCC saw itself further embracing the militant ideas of Malcolm X and nationalism as . . .

A picture of Florynce Keendy

Black Women Organizing for Liberation

This piece is to give the flowers and honour to the Black women that have gone before us who using principles rooted in Black Feminism, futures, freedom and justice to imagine a world where we could be free while using a range of organising tools – from legal aid to direct action – to support radical movements.  . . .