Kwame Ture and comrades in Guinea

Why Did Kwame Ture Move to Africa?

On November 15th, 1998, Kwame Ture (formally Stokely Carmichael) made his physical transition.  I remember where I was when we received the news.  We were at Sacramento State University, early on a Sunday morning, preparing to begin our work study meeting when one of the members came in and made the announcement.  None of us were surprised.  Kwame had been ill with the prostate cancer that eventually took his life for quite some time.  I remember thinking things were about to change for all of us. [Over] Twenty years later, we have gone through major growing pains as an organization . . .

Assata Shakur portrait

When I Actually Got to Hang out with Assata Shakur

Some folks actually follow celebrities from city to city with the objective of taking pictures with these well known actors, musicians, athletes, etc. You’ll never catch me doing anything like that. I’ve actually had opportunities to meet many people in those fields whose work I admire such as George Clinton, Chris Webber, Forest Whitaker, and Derek Jeter. But I passed on walking up to them because although I respect their craft, I just don’t see what they do as something deserving of that level of adulation. At least not from me. What I mean is, it’s not like Jeter, Michael . . .

Reparations now and Economic Justice say two signs held by an African

Reparations: A History of the Struggle in the US

Africans across the globe have been impacted by the structures created to maintain a racist hierarchy established during slavery. In order to ensure that the systems that created Black oppression are dismantled, reparations movements must develop an internationalist orientation. . . .

Qadaffi as a young man.

Reflections on Libya After the Murder of Qadaffi

What Qadaffi understood was embracing the African revolution was kissing Arab Privilege goodbye. Instead of going to Cuba, Venezuela or Zimbabwe to live in exile, which may have preserved his life, he stayed to defend Libya and Africa. Mother Africa will be better off because the way he died left Africans everywhere grappling with a very crucial question. If one who could have been an outright beneficiary of our exploitation and dehumanization died to smash this ruthless cycle, what the hell am I doing still alive? . . .

A banner for the lowndes county freedom organization, the original Black Panther Party.

55 Years Since the Black Panther Party & We Still Affirm Our Right to Defend our Communities

During a year where so many of our people have been abandoned and are looking for direction, we must ask ourselves how might the Black Panther Party grappled with the coronavirus pandemic? How would an organization that looked at the pandemics of their time— dope, illiteracy, police terror, etc., approach supporting communities who desperately need health care that is being withheld from them. . . .

Huey Newton speaks at Boston college

Huey Newton, George Jackson & What They Mean to Us

This week is quite a historical week as it relates to the African liberation struggle within the confines of the colony known as the U.S. In August of 1971, George Jackson, who was incarcerated in California, was murdered inside prison walls there. As a response to his murder and oppressive prison conditions, incarcerated persons from all walks of life banded together at Attica Prison in New York and staged a rebellion that saw about 40 people slaughtered by prison officials and police. In August of 1989, Huey P. Newton, the co-founder of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, and . . .

Black August, COINTELPRO & Learning The Important Lessons

As 2021 moves along, there are a number of things that, like the sun following the moon, remain constant. The international capitalist system continues to utilize its control over our brain waves to promote, institutionalize, and normalize lies, confusion, and misinformation. The masses of humanity continue to resist this oppression in any number of creative and evolving ways. And, the forces attempting to organize against the system continue to claim complete mastery over how the government manipulated our movements in the past while simultaneously and foolishly behaving in the same destructive ways, especially on social media, that sabotaged our work . . .

In this episode, Mack sits down with revolutionary community organizer Kalonji Changa to discuss the true meaning of Black August.

Kalonji Jama Changa on the Meaning of Black August

  Transcript Erica   “The ultimate expression of law is not order — it’s prison… The law and everything that interlocks with it was constructed for poor desperate people.” –George Jackson Peace Africans! My name is Erica and I’m an editor at hood communist and I want to welcome you to hood communist radio!  State oppression breeds many versions of political activism, but prison activism continues to be a unique  form of resistance. In George Jackson’s case, a liberation movement emerged from a space of captivity. The legacy of George Jackson is felt through the continued resistance of prisoners today who, . . .