Flyer for the August 21 & September 9th National “Shut’em Down” Demos

In The Spirit of Abolition, Let’s Shut’em Down!

A call to action. National “Shut’em Down” demonstrations are called for August 21st and September 9th. Originally published on the Jailhouse Lawyers Speak blog. . . .

An elderly Mumia Abu-Jamal

Mumia Update: the New Krasner Brief

by Pam Africa, International Concerned Family & Friends of Mumia Abu-Jamal. This piece was originally published in the San Francisco Bayview. As you can see from our petition, we have been seeking to approach Larry Krasner diplomatically. In our effort to attract the widest possible range of supporters, we have written the petition with polite language. We are trying to give DA Krasner the benefit of the doubt by considering the possibility that he is sincere in his stated desire to confront Philadelphia’s ugly history of racial injustice.  For Mumia’s sake, we truly hope that DA Krasner’s defense of Mumia’s . . .

Anti-France graffiti in Senegal

La FrançAfrique: Senegal & the French Problem

La FrançAfrique: noun. 1) The French neo-colonial system in Africa. 2) France’s Monroe Doctrine like policies that allow it to intervene in African politics to establish governments favorable to the French economy. 3) France’s economic, monetary, military, political, and cultural domination in much of Africa. . . .

Kelly Davis, wife of Keith Davis Jr., leads a protest.

Kelly Davis: The Wife That Won’t Go Away

Last year when Keith Davis Jr. was sentenced to 50 years in prison for a murder he did not commit, his wife Kelly Davis made a commitment to fight. The fight that Kelly has committed to is one with many moving pieces— it’s a fight to preserve her own sanity, a fight to raise her children, a fight to get up every day and go to work, a fight to hold on to her marriage, and a fight against the racist and corrupt Baltimore political establishment. For many African women and non-men, it’s a storied fight, old as our arrival . . .

Somali women and children in a market.

Demand An End to the U.S. Shadow War in Somalia

20 years ago, the CIA and Joint Special Operations Command under George W. Bush began supporting warlords in Somalia to target and kill what the U.S. deemed to be ‘Islamists,’ escalating tensions in the area. 6 years later, the Bush administration began an undeclared war in Somalia launching airstrikes as part of the nation’s imperialist expansion efforts, popularly referred to as the “War on Terror,” starting in Mogadishu with reports claiming that the strikes eventually expanded to all parts of Somalia. These drone and airstrikes were, and are, conducted by AFRICOM (United States Africa Command) which was established in 2007 . . .

The Trade Union Movement Must Launch a Campaign To Organise Minimum Wage Workers

The twenty-first century has seen the Trade Union Movement in Trinidad and Tobago consistently under attack, severely criticized and victimized by the ruling economic and political elites. The thousands of sugar workers were the first group of organised workers this century to suffer mass retrenchment. This, of course, has had the effect of severely weakening a once powerful union. The Unions in petroleum and petrochemical industries have seen a steady decline in their workforce Thousands of direct and indirect Petrotrin workers have been thrown on the breadline as have hundreds of workers at Arcelor Mittal and hundreds at TSTT. Jobs . . .

Colonialism is the Root of Oppression. Only Colonized Working Class Leadership will Smash It!

Here at Black Hammer, we receive a LOT of pushback from angry colonizers (and their lackeys) when they find out about our 4th principle of unity. Why? Because that principle states that we colonized poor and working-class people are the ONLY true proletariat of the world. White people have spat in my direction with their sob stories, “My family was POOR and worked in a COTTON FIELD!” When I explain their position within the cotton field, within the society fashioned by and for them, they spit once more, “All we DO is work!!” And Black Hammer’s response will always be: . . .

Uganda police break up a protest.

Uganda: Police, COVID-19, and Elections

Roots of Policing in Uganda  British colonizers formed the paramilitary Uganda Police Force under the name “Uganda Armed Constabulary” in 1899. Officers placed in leadership positions had experience policing for British interests in Palestine, Jamaica, Gambia, Nigeria, and Kenya, qualifying them to suppress mass rebellions against the colonial government.  The only place where Negroes did not revolt is in the pages of capitalist historians C.L.R James In the early 1900’s, there were rebellions in several parts of Uganda, including Muhumza’s resistance wars to drive out Europeans, the 1907 Nyangire rebellion protesting the colonial imposition of Baganda chiefs in Bunyoro, the . . .