Black Faces With White Power Agendas

After the colonial struggles against European rule in Africa, a majority of the Africans who were able to survive the brutal system of colonialism were the ones who were subservient and benefited from its reign. Kwame Nkrumah who was once President over Ghana after independence struggles with the  British,  coined the phrase Neo-Colonialism as a way of describing a class of Africans who were put in place by the same colonial powers to maintain that power and control over the said country— a way to rule indirectly instead of directly, which caused the majority Africans who were being exploited and . . .

Rest in Power, Toyin Salau

For Toyin Salau

I feel a great rage for the African man that violated Toyin and took her life, but I understand he is a pure creation of the most evil global enemy this planet has ever known. He is a victim in his own way, doomed to a cycle of violence that only total revolution will break, though maybe too late for him. I feel a profound sadness and grief for Toyin’s light extinguished too soon but I also know that there will be many many thousands more women and girls who will suffer like her – new ones every day – until we defeat this enemy once and for all. . . .

Why Juneteenth has a Focus Denied to African Liberation Day

This past weekend, the concept of Juneteenth was discussed and celebrated all throughout the U.S.  Spurred by consciousness brought about by people in the streets protesting police terrorism against the African masses, Juneteenth serves as a pressure point for supporting the history of our resistance against oppression.  For anyone who hasn’t figured it out yet, Juneteenth is the commemoration of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation which ended slavery in the U.S. in 1863.  Due to the corrupt and oppressive nature of chattel slavery as an institution, the slaver masters in Galveston, Texas, U.S., didn’t even bother to tell the . . .

About Love And A Revolution

About Love And A Revolution

Love and abuse cannot coexist. Even while knowing this, people weaponize love as a silencer to harm, in the name of unity. How can harm benefit community? How could silence benefit community? . . .

Black-Outs, ‘Black Lives Matter’ and Black Power

It should be very clear by now that the state moved swiftly to domesticate the resistance by attempting to keep it at a surface level appeal for “racial justice” equipped with symbolic measures, opportunist entertainers and political figures, and NO power. . . .

More Than A Name

When Hood Communist published a piece by the Anti- Police-Terror Project on the caravan protest for Steven Taylor, a 33-year-old Black father of three shot to death by a San Leandro police officer as he struggled with a mental health crisis in a local Walmart, the death of Ahmaud Arbery, shot to death by white vigilantes in Georgia late February, had just become a viral story. Around that same time, the death of Dreasjon “Sean” Reed, shot by Indianapolis police, was seen live on Facebook. Soon after the death of Breonna Taylor, an EMT shot multiple times by Louisville police . . .

No Compromise, No Retreat: Defeat the War Against the African/Black People in the U.S. and Abroad

The justice for George Floyd mobilizations today reflected the state’s worst nightmare – a multi-national and multi-racial action initiated by Black people with Black leadership. So, we say: Justice for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland; for our political prisoners; for the super-exploited Black and Brown working-class; for oppressed Indigenous nations; and for the millions subjected to U.S. warmongering, sanctions, and criminality. We say this to shift the focus from the individualization of this week’s rebellion back to the objective structures of white supremacist, global colonial/capitalist domination. (BAP Newsletter ) The ruling class is befuddled and . . .

10 Thoughts on Ending Anti-Black Violence

1. Liberating Black people from racist violence requires the complete transformation of the US as a racist, colonial state—not selective outrage at individual manifestations of racism or piecemeal reforms of police departments. 2. No act of racist violence is surprising when you realize the United States itself is a 400-year act of racist violence. From its inception the United States has been built on individuals, institutions, and states that harm Black people without repercussions or justice (see: slavery, segregation, policing, prisons, lynching, forced impoverishment, and discrimination in education, healthcare, and housing). 3. The United States = Black Death and Indigenous . . .