The Unknown Relationship between Kwame Nkrumah and Malcolm X

February 21, 2021 marked the 56th commemoration of the assassination of El Hajj Malik El Shabazz aka Malcolm X in Harlem, New York.  The 24th marked the 50th commemoration of the CIA (Criminals In Action) sponsored coup that overthrew Kwame Nkrumah’s democratically elected government in Ghana.  The close historical proximity of the downfall of these Pan-African giants is not coincidental although the history of the relationship between these two men is largely ignored and/or unknown. March 6, 1957, marked the celebration of Ghana becoming the first colonized country in Africa to claim its independence from Europe. During his independence day . . .

Pan-Africanism: The Silver Bullet in the Heart of Empire

The world today is dominated by capitalism and imperialism. Western powers such as the United States, France, and Britain have amassed vast fortunes through mechanisms of violence and terror that have displaced peoples around the globe. Namely, African people have been scattered far and wide by slavery and colonialism. Nonetheless, the African Diaspora maintains cultural and political connections to the homeland and each other wherever their communities are found. The material conditions, political traditions, histories, and cultural productions shared between the communities of African Diaspora have come to form the Pan-African Movement. Through Pan-Africanism, “the gather[ing] of the masses of . . .

Black History Month: From Negro History Week to Pan-African Historical Context

Originally published on The Black Commentator in 2008 “Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history.” – Carter G. Woodson “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots” – Marcus Garvey The need to once and for all embrace a reasonable and comprehensive interpretation of African history that inspires and uplifts Black people is evident when examining how Black History Month is celebrated in US culture. Like most other historic reflections, Black History Month is . . .

Why We Say: Fuck Black History Month, a graphic featuring African sell-outs Lloyd Austin, Kamala Harris, Paul Kagame, Lori Lightfoot, and Barack Obama

Why We Say: Fuck Black History Month

In this statement, members of the Hood Communist Collective will outline what we have identified as four key ways in which Black History Month has been commandeered to work in the interest of the ruling class and paralyze the potential for radical movement-building today. . . .

Another Nation: The Nation of Islam and the Refutation of the Black American Identity

Despite the mass racial psychosis afflicting contemporary Black America that has questioned the validity and relevance of race to the American identity, there has been an organization that, despite the attacks and smears to their work and legacy, have continued to recognize the centrality and importance of race in American political life – The Nation of Islam. The Nation of Islam (N.O.I.) is a Black organization within the United States that continues the tradition of proliferating a race-centric Black politique, one that ties racial identity to political action. Through the teachings of the N.O.I., the organization instills within their membership . . .

Colonialism is the Root of Oppression. Only Colonized Working Class Leadership will Smash It!

Here at Black Hammer, we receive a LOT of pushback from angry colonizers (and their lackeys) when they find out about our 4th principle of unity. Why? Because that principle states that we colonized poor and working-class people are the ONLY true proletariat of the world. White people have spat in my direction with their sob stories, “My family was POOR and worked in a COTTON FIELD!” When I explain their position within the cotton field, within the society fashioned by and for them, they spit once more, “All we DO is work!!” And Black Hammer’s response will always be: . . .

Pseudo Black Nationalism; Toxic Masculinity & Homophobia

Black Nationalism at face value has its honored place in history.  Despite the efforts by racist Europeans and accommodating negroes to denounce it for centuries, the concept of Black Nationalism has always been a survival tool for the African masses.  As Sekou Ture eloquently points out in his classic and widely missed analysis of “Negritude,” Black Nationalism was African people’s response to colonialism and slavery.  Since a major component of institutionalizing those racist systems was for the bourgeois to develop and nurture the concept of white supremacy, Black Nationalism has always been our way of deconstructing racist ideology and proclaiming . . .

Capitol police officer Eugene Goodman seen holding off protesters at the U.S. Capitol and in a photo from his days as a U.S. soldier. (XVIII Airborne Corps/Twitter)

We Have To Stop Valorizing Black Cops

Policing in America is facing a PR crisis. Following the May 25th murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, the term “defund the police” has become a rallying cry for thousands across the country. Six months later, however, America has not defunded it’s police force––and in fact, has in some cases taken steps to give police departments even more money. Instead, police forces across America have taken an insidious approach: painting their departments in blackface.     After the January 6th Trump riot at the Capitol building, Yoganda Pittman, a Black woman, was named the new Chief of . . .