Biden and Trump puppets illustrating the election spectacle

The Election Spectacle

Advertisements are ramping up, words are becoming fiercer, and skeletons are coming out of candidates’ closets. This game is nothing new, yet we play it all the time. What does it mean to vote? What does the election spectacle do for us? Within a bourgeois fantasy, it is to elect a person who is totally accountable to the community they represent. I mean . . . this is the ideal, an ideal which has material consequences. The fantasies are, in some perverted way, a reality. The structures and institutions we all engage with organize around these principles rooted in anti-blackness . . .

An amazon worker holds a sign calling for co-workers to vote yes to a union. Unions make good jobs.

Why So Few of Us Have a Good Job

A good job is obviously one that brings you a sense of fulfillment while carrying it out.  Since you are going to spend so much time there, more than you will with your loved ones, than this is a pretty important requirement.  Other equally important characteristics of a good job are livable wages, quality health care, and a good retirement program.  This means a wage that permits you to have a roof over your head, place food on the table, pay all your necessities, and have enough left over to save for a rainy day and enjoy some of the . . .

voluntary poverty

Anti-Consumerism & Voluntary Poverty

‘Mutual Aid’ as both concept and practice was reignited under the conditions of the pandemic that called for collective approaches for survival. However, as the years have continued, mutual aid has been redefined continuously and is now synonymous with ‘charity’ (which is not a bad thing, but is quite different). Crowdfunding links are flooding the internet by the hundreds, but as time continues, pushing more people into the margins and squeezing them financially, that method seems to be increasingly becoming less and less effective. And for whatever reason requests for funds are made, the fact that it is overwhelming, continuous . . .

Free the land - a demand of FROLINAN and an expression of their revolutionary nationalist ideology for liberation

We Must Be Guided by Revolutionary Ideology

In this country (the u.s.), all of our experiences are the material result of ideology. The schools, the clothes, the media, the workplace, the cars, the judicial system, are all manifestations of the ideology of white supremacist capitalism. This ideology is expanded and imposed upon the inhabitants of the planet through imperialism, and the superstructures made to strengthen it – structures like NATO, the IMF, the United Nations, and AFRICOM. Many of us (especially New Afrikans, Latin Americans, Afrikans on the continent and other oppressed peoples) did not choose this ideology – it’s been forced on us! . . .

WERD, which became America's first black-owned radio station in 1949, is now used as a space for Atlanta artists to perform on Wednesday nights.

Black Radio & the Struggle for Pan-Africanism

The 1960’s and 70’s proved itself a paramount time for Black Folks. Not since the beginning of the century with mass organization led by Marcus Garvey, had there been such great instituting towards a better future for Africans globally. In North America there was a rise in Black nationalism and racial pride, ultimately emphasizing the need for Power. Africans in the Caribbean and parts of South America participated in active armed struggles and insurrections against colonial supported governments. They fought strategically to dismantle the systems of economic subjugation that were based upon race. In Europe, Africans held mass demonstrations in . . .

A People's Program member at the People's Breakfast in Oakland, an example of a revolutionary as opposed to missionary program.

Are You a Missionary or a Revolutionary?

In a recent panel, Delency posed the question to his fellow panelists: “are you a missionary or a revolutionary?” The question naturally arose since the panel featured groups and people who are actively participating in food and community programs. Over the course of the discussion, it became clear that folks are engaged in the work for different reasons. Two members of People’s Programs (Yemi & Delency) participated in the panel and it was their goal to have an honest conversation with the other panelists (and themselves) about why they are doing this work: to make themselves feel good, or to . . .

Food sovereignty activists protest outside a corporate seed conference convened by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Organised by Global Justice Now.

Building Power with Food Sovereignty

Let’s talk about food sovereignty, Africa, the economic impoverishment of the diaspora and Indigenous people at large. How does Africa, the biggest continent on the planet, import 85% of its entire food chain? African countries consist of 27 out of 34 the countries around the world that are unable to feed themselves, according to worldatlas.com. That’s 27 out of Africa’s 54 divided countries. Half the countries of Africa! The countries the world atlas refers to are also heavily involved in conflict or are in post-war devastation. This is all neo-colonial industrial military complex profiteering and resource extraction. Europe still has . . .

Members of Mapinduzi and members of the Roon Nation

​​The New Afrikan Struggle and Roon Nation

Neo-liberalism has infiltrated the hearts and minds of seemingly all Africans in the U.S. False notions of inclusion — or better yet inclusion in a system that degrades Black people have captivated and polluted the minds of our People. Not only are we accepting bread crumbs and allowing each other to sit at the very same tables our ancestors would have destroyed, we have also been distracted by things that in no way shape or form advance us as a People. We have been distracted by things that keep us away from focusing on our actual oppression.  What we need . . .