The Most Revolutionary Thing We Can Do This Year

Well, some highlights from my observations from this past year. Some things that I still enjoy looking back on: That magic moment in March, when a New York Times article exposed that Democrats were hesitantly admitting that they did in fact drop the ball during Obama’s administration in regard to his rescue package, that really wasn’t. Democrats were angry at the consistently cheap Republicans who didn’t want to give any assistance to struggling Americans during the Coronavirus pandemic, but they also admitted that the rescue package from Obama’s first term was woefully lacking, too cautious and too deferential to those . . .

#NoMore protests against US intervention in Ethiopia

#NoMore: How the Left Can Get Ethiopia Right

Editor’s Note: The following is the writer’s opinion and was first published in Black Agenda Report. Correction: A previous version of this article erroneously connected Lausan Collective to the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). A member of Lausan Collective had served as a fellow at the Taiwan Foundation for Democracy, an organization that has collaborated with the NED. In the last few months, the left media outlets from various camps, in their sincere attempts to demonstrate solidarity and spotlight conflict in the Horn of Africa and internal developments in Ethiopia, got it wrong. They have been uncritically centering active ideological players on two . . .

Activists protesting outside the Rittenhouse trial

Rittenhouse and Verdict Mania

Black people give great attention to certain court cases in hopes of receiving justice when the system is designed to be unjust. That recognition and the commitment to fighting back will be of greater use than divining conclusions about a racist nation when juries reach verdicts. . . .

Everyday abolition in practice at the Black Panther Party Breakfast Program

Everyday Abolition

Abolition is a verb, a practice.  The act of abolition generates an abundance of new opportunities.  It is alive with possibility!  Abolition is presence.  It requires our attention and care.  It forces us to think wide and imagine.  What does a just world look like?  What does mass peace feel like? . . .

Russell "Maroon" Shoatz is pictured after his release from solitary confinement.

Russell “Maroon” Shoatz is Free, But We Need to Free Them All

Of course there is deeply felt happiness that Shoatz will be freed for whatever time remains in his life, but no one should forget the tortures he suffered, including 22 years in solitary confinement. No one should forget the other prisoners such as Mumia Abu Jamal, Ruchell Magee, Sundiata Acoli, and Dr. Mutulu Shakur. They are the best known, but there are hundreds of people imprisoned since the days of the liberation movement. That movement was crushed in part because its most committed fighters were locked away. . . .

A banner for the lowndes county freedom organization, the original Black Panther Party.

55 Years Since the Black Panther Party & We Still Affirm Our Right to Defend our Communities

During a year where so many of our people have been abandoned and are looking for direction, we must ask ourselves how might the Black Panther Party grappled with the coronavirus pandemic? How would an organization that looked at the pandemics of their time— dope, illiteracy, police terror, etc., approach supporting communities who desperately need health care that is being withheld from them. . . .

Funeral for Black Panther Party member Bobby Hutton

When You Die, What Will People Say About You?

Get in the practice of periodically asking yourself the same question.  If you were to drop dead right now, what would people say about you?  The answer to that question will never be provided by how many internet arguments you believe you won.  It won’t materialize based upon how many people you overtalked or abusively dominated.  And, it won’t be influenced by whatever image of yourself you spent so much time constructing that has absolutely nothing to do with who you really are as a person.  . . .