African Liberation Day: We Unify or We Die

#AfricanLiberationDay: We Unify or We Die

African people’s struggle against oppression, colonialism, zionism, and imperialism is commemorated each year with African Liberation Day. Founded on April 15th,1958 by Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, the First Conference of Independent States was held in Accra, Ghana, and attended by eight independent African states. It aimed to create awareness and amplify decolonization struggles and symbolize African nations’ determination to free themselves from foreign domination and exploitation. . . .

A hurricane forming over the earth - the winds of change

The Winds of Change

You strive for freedom. You are engaged in a struggle for liberation that has many complex layers. Your age old struggle includes every effort to take control of your affairs and stand on equal footing with humanity. Your process is a cultural tradition that stands in antagonistic contradiction to all forms of exploitation and oppression. . . .

African Liberation Day 1977 in Washington DC

African Liberation Day Lives!

The All-African People’s Revolutionary Party thanks and congratulates you for commemorating African Liberation Day. Your active participation in the events of this important day are the best evidence that you have ignored those who are either misguided or hostile to our people when they say that Africa is no longer at the center of our struggle for justice. . . .

Forward to African Liberation Day! Victory in the Class Struggle is Certain

Victory in the Class Struggle is Certain

We, like [Amilcar] Cabral, must have a clear and comprehensive analysis of all the classes engaged in the contemporary class struggle. We must understand that each class struggle happens in time and space. Each person in their locales has a history of resistance, class conflict, and class collaboration. While there is a universal aspect that unites all class struggles, at the base every class struggle emerges from a particular cultural context and must address the interest of the people living within that cultural context. . . .

Black hands clasped together to say unity is accountability

The Art of Accountability

The art of accountability relies on consistency & integrity. Without consistency, there can be no standard. Without integrity, there can be no honor. As a collective it is imperative for a people to have an honorable merit of excellency that is most beneficial to the whole. . . .

Members of the All African Women's Revolutionary Union

The All African Women’s Revolutionary Union is Building Pan-Africanism!

The All-African Women’s Revolutionary Union (AAWRU), like the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, was born out of the political and ideological struggle for liberation of all African and all indigenous people over hundreds of years of colonialism, neo-colonialism and imperialism where African women have always played a critical and decisive role. . . .

Joe Biden looking slightly sad, perhaps contemplating the passive revolution..

Joe Biden and the ‘Passive Revolution’

Though it appears that Biden has pulled off a revival of centrism amid an ‘organic crisis’, his honeymoon period will be short-lived as there is a crisis of legitimacy of the ideas, institutions, and coalitions that undergird U.S. neoliberal capitalism. During moments like this, the ruling class may attempt what Gramsci called a ‘passive revolution’ – implementing symbolic or limited change from above without fundamentally transforming social relations – to restore its hegemony and stave off challenges to its position within society. Key parts of this process include the co-optation of demands from below, new political coalitions, paying lip service . . .

History is a Weapon of Struggle: Build African Liberation Month

As Black History Month 2013 begins, we are re-posting this piece by Ajamu Nangwaya.  We are now in February and for Africans in North America it is a significant month. It is usually observed as Black History Month. It is taken as an opportunity to acknowledge African people’s struggles, achievements and commemorate significant moments in the fight against white supremacy, capitalism, sexism and other forms of oppression. Some of us use this month to reflect and rededicate ourselves to the revolutionary or radical African political tradition. In the spirit of collective self-criticism, are we at the point where Black History . . .