Ruby Doris Smith

Ruby Doris Smith-Robinson: A Tower of Strength

Despite the loss of her physical presence, there is not an African alive anywhere on earth who has not been touched by the legacy of her movement work. Her courage, determination, and commitment to lifting us higher are principles that will continue to inspire our movement for justice and forward progress. . . .

Pictures of Somali at a protest.

The Historical Roots of the Somali Election Crisis

Elections in the Somali capital of Muqdisho have been delayed due to disagreements between the President and the opposition – a coalition of regional governors and prominent national politicians, including the recently removed premier and two former presidents. This essay argues that the recurring political crisis between different ruling-class factions and between Muqdisho and the provinces has its roots not in the ideological afterlives of a pre-colonial ‘tribal’ mode of living – as per the dominant narrative, but in the country’s integration into the global capitalist-imperialist system since the late 19th century, and especially since the neoliberal recolonisation of the country in the aftermath of the 1977–78 Ogaden War. . . .

Cuban propaganda celebrating revolutionary African women

Celebrating Revolutionary African Women

This month the editors of Hood Communist will be celebrate revolutionary African working class women and their contributions to the struggle for African liberation. To kick off the celebration, here are five revolutionary African women you should know. . . .

An urban school behind a chain link fence. A child looks at it from the sidewalk.

Are Urban Schools a Site of Occupation?

 In the third season of Black Lightning, the fictional Black city of Freeland was living under a military occupation by the ASA (the quasi governmental organization occupying Freeland). Not only did the city have heavily armed troopers patrolling the streets, but also had troopers patrolling the schools– detaining anyone they deemed a threat – using violence if necessary.  In episode four, students are in a classroom discussing similar military occupations in multiple countries around the world and their harmful effects on the people being occupied.  Some students agree, but then others claim the ASA occupying their city might be a . . .

An African woman resists the police at anti-Museveni protests in Uganda

Extending the Imagination of African Gender Thought

African women combat unique oppression. Cisheteropatriarchy, racial capitalism, colorism, and so forth. However, there are specific historical and cultural realities many African women exist within that are distinct to continental African women. . . .

Africans protest racist conditions produced by Zionist in occupied Palestine.

Zionism’s Shrewd Manipulation of African Movements

Clearly, a movement based upon justice can never cut deals with the forces that oppress their people, especially when those deals are designed to increase repression against the people in order to hurry along a political objective. Yet that’s exactly what the zionist movement did and its what it continued to do by manipulating African movements for justice against white supremacy. . . .

History is a Weapon of Struggle: Build African Liberation Month

As Black History Month 2013 begins, we are re-posting this piece by Ajamu Nangwaya.  We are now in February and for Africans in North America it is a significant month. It is usually observed as Black History Month. It is taken as an opportunity to acknowledge African people’s struggles, achievements and commemorate significant moments in the fight against white supremacy, capitalism, sexism and other forms of oppression. Some of us use this month to reflect and rededicate ourselves to the revolutionary or radical African political tradition. In the spirit of collective self-criticism, are we at the point where Black History . . .

Fidel Castro and Maurice Bishop in Cuba

Cuba and the Struggle for Black Liberation

Black people have had a long, brutal, and disgusting history in the US & Cuba because of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade which is connected to colonialism that then became imperialism in the 20th century. The Spanish were the ones to first establish a population of enslaved Africans to begin working on  exports that would be used to enrich the colonizers in the 16th century. The genesis of enslaved Africans first coming  into Cuba could be traced to 1511 when Diego Velasquez conquered the island of Cuba in 1511-12. One  cannot talk about slavery in Cuba without mentioning the Spanish and . . .