The Murders of Malcolm X & Pio Gama Pinto

On the 21st of February, 1965, Malcolm X was killed in the Washington Heights neighborhood while speaking to an audience in Harlem, New York. Malcolm had just formed a new movement, the Organization of Afro-American Unity (OAAU), having left the Nation of Islam the previous year. He was 39 years old. Three days later, on the 24th of February 1965, Pio Gama Pinto, a socialist revolutionary in Kenya, was assassinated outside his home in Nairobi. He was 38 years old. The assassination of both Pinto and Malcolm X in the same week has long raised serious questions and conspiracy theories . . .

An African doctor looks at a clipboard. Text on the image says folks suffering from sadness or depression might be suffering from capitalism.

To Save Black Mental Health, Destroy Racial Capitalism

“Amerika trips me and proceeds to ask me how I fell; whips me, then asks me how to stop the bleeding.” There is no conversation about the state of mental health in Amerika’s Black communities without discussing the violence wrought on them by racial capitalism—a term coined by Cedric Robinson. Robinson, a pioneer in the study of the Black Radical Tradition, argued that the “development, organization and expansion of capitalist society pursued essentially racial directions.”1 It is this pursuit that has helped shape many of today’s societal ills, including poor rates of Black mental health. Historical oppression, including slavery, sharecropping, . . .

From left to right: Black musicians Paul Robeson, Billie Holiday and Tupac Shakur

A Short History of the US War Against Black Musicians

Introduction  The polarizing nature of the Black Power Movement captured the attention of the entire nation. The revolutionary rhetoric espoused by prominent Black organizations and activists also earned the full attention of intelligence agencies in the United States hell-bent on quelling any support of socialist economic practices at the height of the Cold War. Covert operations like the FBI’s infamous Counterintelligence Program (COINTELPRO) identified, surveilled, defamed, and often murdered Black leaders they deemed capable of leading an organized rebellion against the US government. The rise of radical organizations like the Black Panther Party produced a counterculture that encouraged cultural pride . . .

What European settler-colonialism looked like in Africa

Imperialism Was Built on Settler-Colonialism

Abstract This paper builds on Nkrumah’s approach of starting from the point of knowing the enemy.  Collective imperialism, sham independence and neo-colonialism as described in Book One Chapter One of Nkrumah’s Handbook of Revolutionary Warfare are re-examined in the context of 21st century globalization.  Capitalism was built on the theft of land and resources in the process of colonization.  The most extensive exploitation of land and resources resulted in the near extermination of indigenous peoples and the creation of powerful settler regimes that serve to support the dominance of USA-European capitalism.  Racism played a key role in justifying the barbaric . . .

Alyssa V. Hope of the abolitionist @comradealyssa campaign

Abolitionist Efforts to Trangress the Prison Walls

Incarcerated radical intellectuals elucidate the nature of political struggle and its various arenas. Alongside these writers are solidarity groups that propagate their writings and intellectual products. Through a close reading of Black Communist trans prisoner Alyssa V. Hope’s legal efforts and writings, this article unearths how a pen-pal relationship transformed into a comprehensive abolitionist community. This case study provides an ex-ample of how abolitionists are grappling with the need to support the material needs of marginalised communities while still building otherwise possible worlds separate from a failing welfare state. Mutual aid projects, like the one formed by Hope’s supporters, showcase that otherwise possible worlds are not only possible, but they are being created right now be-fore us. . . .

Afrikan Children and the Miseducation System

Afrikan Children and the Miseducation System

It is typically agreed upon in Black/Afrikan colonies throughout so called america that the education/miseducation system is at minimum, a complete disaster when it comes to our Black babies and their wellbeing. Our babies being suspended and expelled from preschools, armed pigs occupying the halls of middle and high schools, the hyper-sexualization of young women through dress code policy, mush and milk passed off as food, and the lack of basic educational resources like textbooks, desks, or even teachers has been well documented, discussed, and deplored. When properly analyzed, one can conclude that these conditions, which plague Black/Afrikan schools across . . .

An artist's depiction of Bussa's Rebellion - an enslaved African uprising against British rule in Barbados.

Britain’s Legacy of Brutal Slavery in Barbados

Yes, the British Empire is indeed one colony smaller as Barbados formally declared itself independent of its colonial rulers after 400 years yesterday in a big ole fancy ceremony attended by all kinds of dignitaries. England’s Prince Charles delivered a message from his mother, Queen Elizabeth, conveying the “warmest good wishes” and said, “from the darkest days of our past and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which, whatever stains out of his study, the people of this island forge their path with extraordinary fortitude.” It’s nice that he mentioned that appalling history of slavery, but it deserves more than a . . .

crash test dummies

Are Black People the Crash Test Dummies for Democrats?

Liberals, Black, white, and otherwise have been using Black people as crash test dummies while showing sheer disregard for most of Black America during almost all the last 50 plus year counter-revolution. . . .