HUMANS ARE NOT THE VIRUS—DON’T BE AN ECO-FASCIST

This article on eco-fascism was originally posted in Wear Your Voice Humans are not the virus. We are not a sickness or a disease, and y’all should stop singing this tired refrain as we are all reeling from the global Coronavirus pandemic. With several false reports of animals flourishing as cities slow down due to quarantine recently going viral (how ironic), a concerning amount of people have responded with the sentiment that the presence of humans living and taking up space on our planet is its own type of sickness. People are even circulating an article from 2018 about the . . .

Making the Case for Reproductive Revolution

In the wake of multiple state decisions to suspend abortion care during the coronavirus outbreak, revolutionaries must, once again, turn their gazes to the rejection of the state as a sanctioning authority. State abandonment of responsibilities related to reproductive life is but another signal to Black organizers to take reproductive health measures into their own hands, with or without state authorization or support. Human rights exist independently of the state apparatus and the paradigm within which they are currently located is imaginary and conceptual. There is no better time to exercise self-determination and autonomy than now. Jubilation. Sarah Weddington was . . .

A PERSPECTIVE ON COVID-19 FROM KENYA AND THE U.S.

A Perspective on COVID-19 from Kenya and the US

We, as members of the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, have written a joint perspective on the current COVID-19 pandemic. As crisis engulfs the masses worldwide, opportunists, snakes, fascists, and all manner of enemies slither out of the tall grass, poised to prey upon the fear, confusion, and pain that exploited and oppressed peoples are exposed to under capitalism. . . .

vigilante violence within the context of transformative justice

to which extents are vigilante violence allowed and mandated and disallowed within contexts of transformative justice? ziggy farrow walker. hey all! it been a while. i just got off the phone with my sister actually. when we were younger, she and my twin and i used to fight and fight and fight. til we were all screaming and crying- and bleeding sometimes. we agreed never to speak to each other again almost every week on the yard after school. all very carceral. when we got a little older and stopped fighting, we recognized our earlier contention as trauma bonding and . . .

The Compensation is Freedom

Capitalism preys on revolutionary strategy. It eats Black culture for breakfast. It siphons organic energy from the impetus of movement workers. In the 21st century, the Non-Profit Industrial Complex is its primary agent in this pursuit. That the NPIC monopolizes movement resources is accepted quite unanimously throughout radical, Black spaces. And, yet, there is a conspicuous lack of acknowledgment of Black complicity in this phenomenon. Black movement workers regard their own relationship to nonprofit malpractice as inevitable or as minimally harmful given the choices they are faced in navigating a capitalist, racialized society. The Black movement worker’s role in commercializing . . .

Keith Davis Jr and The Convenience of Criminality

⁣ The case against Keith Davis Jr. is entangled in Baltimore politics and political allegiances. What has happened in these last five years has been on par with the neoliberal democratic misleadership engulfing the city.⁣ Keith Davis Jr. should not have survived on the morning of June 7th, 2015.  Assumed to be a hack thief, a case of mistaken identity led four Baltimore police officers to corner Davis Jr. into a dark garage after an on-foot chase in West Baltimore. Those four officers let off up to 44 rounds of bullets in that garage, resulting in Davis Jr. being shot . . .

Living for the Oppressed: A Journal Entry

Living for the Oppressed: A Journal Entry (2011) December 9, 2011 | Filed under: Articles, News and Updates and tagged with: Red Onion State Prison Conditions/News  *This “article” is an entry made into a journal I was keeping in 2011 – a sort of prison diary – which only lasted a couple of weeks.   A typical day. Had a good one-on-one exchange with KB today. Although he’s housed in the cell next to me, we hadn’t talked for about a week. He expressed frustration with me. Feeling years in segregation has affected my mind – negatively – in that . . .

ADOS and American Exceptionalism in Africans

ADOS and American Exceptionalism in Africans

It now seems to be a ritual: when a new movie is announced with story, cast, and production crew primarily made up of Africans, a boisterous debate ricochets around the Blackest parts of social media: who made this, who’s in it, and is it for us? For many African people living in the US, the response is always a resounding “I’m rooting for everybody Black.” (Credit to Issa Rae) For as long as we’ve been captives on this territory the majority of our people have expressed some form of intrinsic nationalism – a kind of instinctual proto-African nationalist sentiment. Certainly . . .