Pan-Africanism: The Silver Bullet in the Heart of Empire

The world today is dominated by capitalism and imperialism. Western powers such as the United States, France, and Britain have amassed vast fortunes through mechanisms of violence and terror that have displaced peoples around the globe. Namely, African people have been scattered far and wide by slavery and colonialism. Nonetheless, the African Diaspora maintains cultural and political connections to the homeland and each other wherever their communities are found. The material conditions, political traditions, histories, and cultural productions shared between the communities of African Diaspora have come to form the Pan-African Movement. Through Pan-Africanism, “the gather[ing] of the masses of . . .

An African woman resists the police at anti-Museveni protests in Uganda

Extending the Imagination of African Gender Thought

African women combat unique oppression. Cisheteropatriarchy, racial capitalism, colorism, and so forth. However, there are specific historical and cultural realities many African women exist within that are distinct to continental African women. . . .

African children at a rally to free political prisoners organized by the Black Panther Party.

An Analysis of the “Free Huey” Speech by Kwame Turé

In “Free Huey,” Kwame Turé underlines the concept of survival. Turé argues that the survival “of a race of people…is all that is at stake”. By establishing this, Turé discusses the roles that resistance, the vote (its futility, rather), allyship, and ideologies play in contributing to survival. . . .

History is a Weapon of Struggle: Build African Liberation Month

As Black History Month 2013 begins, we are re-posting this piece by Ajamu Nangwaya.  We are now in February and for Africans in North America it is a significant month. It is usually observed as Black History Month. It is taken as an opportunity to acknowledge African people’s struggles, achievements and commemorate significant moments in the fight against white supremacy, capitalism, sexism and other forms of oppression. Some of us use this month to reflect and rededicate ourselves to the revolutionary or radical African political tradition. In the spirit of collective self-criticism, are we at the point where Black History . . .

Fidel Castro and Maurice Bishop in Cuba

Cuba and the Struggle for Black Liberation

Black people have had a long, brutal, and disgusting history in the US & Cuba because of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade which is connected to colonialism that then became imperialism in the 20th century. The Spanish were the ones to first establish a population of enslaved Africans to begin working on  exports that would be used to enrich the colonizers in the 16th century. The genesis of enslaved Africans first coming  into Cuba could be traced to 1511 when Diego Velasquez conquered the island of Cuba in 1511-12. One  cannot talk about slavery in Cuba without mentioning the Spanish and . . .

Black History Month: From Negro History Week to Pan-African Historical Context

Originally published on The Black Commentator in 2008 “Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history.” – Carter G. Woodson “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots” – Marcus Garvey The need to once and for all embrace a reasonable and comprehensive interpretation of African history that inspires and uplifts Black people is evident when examining how Black History Month is celebrated in US culture. Like most other historic reflections, Black History Month is . . .

Image: Trump Supporters Hold "Stop The Steal" Rally In DC Amid Ratification Of Presidential Election

White Squatters Rights in Crisis

The white-on-white crime events of January 6th, 2021, at the U.S. Capitol was an eye-soaring squint into the internal class contradictions of white supremacy. More specifically, it was a historical snapshot capturing a long-running legal dispute over preemption or what I refer to as white squatters rights: the unabashed freedom of white Europeans to illegitimately occupy stolen land and property.  Contemporarily, squatting is when a person (think invader) moves into an uninhabited home (think land), refuses to leave, and also claims it as their own (sound familiar?). Originally, Senator Henry Clay designed The Pre-Emption Act of 1841 as a compromise . . .

Black Labor and Liberation in the Disposable Era

Since the rebellion in Ferguson, Missouri in August 2014, Black people throughout the United States have been grappling with a number of critical questions such as why are Black people being hunted and killed every 28 hours or more by various operatives of the law? Why don’t Black people seem to matter to this society? And what can and must we do to end these attacks and liberate ourselves? There are concrete answers to these questions. Answers that are firmly grounded in the capitalist dynamics that structure the brutal European settler-colonial project we live in and how Afrikan people have . . .