A picture of Sekou Toure, a PDG demonstration against French colonialism, a French attack in Guinea

How Guinea and the PDG Helped Shape Modern Pan-Africanism

Today, the European left has embraced African revolutionaries like Amilcar Cabral from Guinea-Bissau.  If you follow their writings on his contributions, you would believe he was a Marxist-Leninist who was seeking to build a Marxist-Leninist party in Guinea-Bissau.  In Ghana, the truth and actual legacy of Kwame Nkrumah is finally being brought to the surface and as a result, those same white left forces are moving to position Nkrumah in their analysis as an African leader they endorse.  Cabral and Nkrumah are being embraced by these forces as a result of their continuing popularity among the African masses.  They have engaged . . .

An African man at a protest standing in front of a Palestinian flag.

Smash Zionism

In 1986, The All-African People’s Revolutionary Party distributed their second educational brochure on zionism. The first educational brochure, which was printed in 1977, was entitled “lSRAEL COMMITS MASS MURDER OF PALESTINIAN AND AFRICAN PEOPLES: ZIONISM lS RAClSM. lT MUST BE DESTROYED.” We distributed more than half a million copies throughout the United States and in other countries.  Like its predecessor, the second brochure has as its central purpose, the education of the masses of Africans (all people of African descent wherever they live in the world are African) about zionism. In the first brochure, the A-APRP called for the creation . . .

John McCain giving a speech with a neo-nazi

Liberal Democracy: The Bedfellow of Fascism

Antifascism, as a politic and concept, has grown more appealing in the last 6 years because of the rise of right-wing authoritarianism domestically and globally rooted in patriarchy and ongoing (settler) colonialism. Nonetheless, there remains much confusion about fascism. Earlier this month, I was a featured panelist for a roundtable discussion with the editors of For Antifascist Futures: Against the Violence of Imperial Crisis and author of On Microfascism: Gender War and Death at the Red Emma’s bookstore in Baltimore. It was a compelling cultural and political exploration wherein we engaged the feminist and anticolonial dimensions of antifascism with readers . . .

Haitian man with fist up in a march

For Peace in the Americas, We Must Center Haiti

Adapted from remarks given by Austin Cole, Interim Co-Coordinator of Black Alliance for Peace’s Haiti and the Americas Team, as part of “America v. CELAC: Whither the Monroe Doctrine at 200?” hosted by the International Manifesto Group. As the crisis of imperialism in Haiti continues and US-led ‘Western’ nations debate how best to sell an escalated military invasion, it is imperative that we continue to say No to Military Intervention in Haiti. Yes to Haitian Self-Determination. But this is the bare minimum, we must also understand and center the critical role that Haiti plays in the Western Hemisphere – particularly . . .

The Nigerian middle-class through the years

The African Middle-Class is Either Sleeping or Disarmed

Capitalism and its fraying edges should be discarded, its presence grows dull and boring even though millions of Africans experience capitalism in its most vicious expressions, maybe this is why there is a kind of passiveness to its observation or critique. It becomes the most affected, the most harmed, and the most vulnerable that move to educate whoever will listen on the contradictions staring everyone in the face and how to resist and change the status-quo. With the Nigerian, and by extension, African middle-class in mind, it is vital to note the subtle complicity with neoliberalism within our societies. The . . .

African and Indigenous people hold signs announcing their solidarity in Ecuador.

Black & Indigenous Solidarity Takes Root in Ecuador

Last week the Black and Indigenous Liberation Movement (BILM) organized a coalition congress between Black and Indigenous communities throughout Abya Yala, which includes the regions of North, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean. BILM held the congress in Quito, Ecuador which has been the center of nationwide strikes throughout this year. This strike led by Indigenous and Black community leaders, against rising food and fuel costs, awakened a decades long issue of the Ecuadorian government excluding Indigenous and Black Ecuadorians politically, socially, and economically. The strikes brought together Black, Indigenous, student, and women groups, to bring the country to . . .

Picture of a protest

Hashtag Activism and US Imperialism

The abundance of “hashtag activism” has created a false sense of importance for the everyday individual being driven by weaponized empathy to speak out about a cause or injustice happening internationally. This false sense of importance, brought on by the use of hashtags as awareness, is ignited by already held biases about the colonized world, which inevitably leads to both overt and covert calls for western intervention to “save” whoever has been deemed needing of saving.  The use of hashtag activism has certainly all but replaced in-person community organizing. It has allowed an array of people across the country and . . .

Kwame Nkrumah giving a speech to African heads of state at the founding of the Organization of African Unity

The Enemy’s Unity vs. African Unity

Unity has been the watchword for Africa’s enemies. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) united countries engaged in colonialism and imperialism under the leadership of the United States. NATO’s role in Africa has been to defend the United States and Western Europe’s economic dominance over Africa’s land and resources. As just one example, NATO supported fascist Portugal with planes, ships, and arms in the fight to preserve colonies in the 1960s and 1970s. NATO remains a threat to Africa and the world. Under the leadership of U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), Africa’s enemies united and used military force to attempt to . . .