Africans protest racist conditions produced by Zionist in occupied Palestine.

Zionism’s Shrewd Manipulation of African Movements

Clearly, a movement based upon justice can never cut deals with the forces that oppress their people, especially when those deals are designed to increase repression against the people in order to hurry along a political objective. Yet that’s exactly what the zionist movement did and its what it continued to do by manipulating African movements for justice against white supremacy. . . .

History is a Weapon of Struggle: Build African Liberation Month

As Black History Month 2013 begins, we are re-posting this piece by Ajamu Nangwaya.  We are now in February and for Africans in North America it is a significant month. It is usually observed as Black History Month. It is taken as an opportunity to acknowledge African people’s struggles, achievements and commemorate significant moments in the fight against white supremacy, capitalism, sexism and other forms of oppression. Some of us use this month to reflect and rededicate ourselves to the revolutionary or radical African political tradition. In the spirit of collective self-criticism, are we at the point where Black History . . .

Fidel Castro and Maurice Bishop in Cuba

Cuba and the Struggle for Black Liberation

Black people have had a long, brutal, and disgusting history in the US & Cuba because of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade which is connected to colonialism that then became imperialism in the 20th century. The Spanish were the ones to first establish a population of enslaved Africans to begin working on  exports that would be used to enrich the colonizers in the 16th century. The genesis of enslaved Africans first coming  into Cuba could be traced to 1511 when Diego Velasquez conquered the island of Cuba in 1511-12. One  cannot talk about slavery in Cuba without mentioning the Spanish and . . .

Protesters try to pass the police cordon during a demonstration to demand the resignation of Haitian president Jovenel Moise, in the streets of Petion Ville, Port-au-Prince

The Caribbean Diaspora Has A SOUTHCOM Problem

Only in office for three weeks, Joe Biden administration’s ideas for ‘Building Back Better,’ which includes repositioning the US as ‘leader’ on the world stage, has been making itself evident and coming in hot with foreign policy. Recently, think tank, The Atlantic Council, held a virtual forum titled, “Passing The Baton 2021: Securing America’s Future Together ” forum, moderated by Condoleezza Rice. The event exposed the administration’s collaboration with the State Department to continue antagonizing Iran, China, and Russia. But what has been most evident through actions has been this administration’s attention on the Caribbean.   At the end of 2020, . . .

Why We Say: Fuck Black History Month, a graphic featuring African sell-outs Lloyd Austin, Kamala Harris, Paul Kagame, Lori Lightfoot, and Barack Obama

Why We Say: Fuck Black History Month

In this statement, members of the Hood Communist Collective will outline what we have identified as four key ways in which Black History Month has been commandeered to work in the interest of the ruling class and paralyze the potential for radical movement-building today. . . .

The Trade Union Movement Must Launch a Campaign To Organise Minimum Wage Workers

The twenty-first century has seen the Trade Union Movement in Trinidad and Tobago consistently under attack, severely criticized and victimized by the ruling economic and political elites. The thousands of sugar workers were the first group of organised workers this century to suffer mass retrenchment. This, of course, has had the effect of severely weakening a once powerful union. The Unions in petroleum and petrochemical industries have seen a steady decline in their workforce Thousands of direct and indirect Petrotrin workers have been thrown on the breadline as have hundreds of workers at Arcelor Mittal and hundreds at TSTT. Jobs . . .

Uganda police break up a protest.

Uganda: Police, COVID-19, and Elections

Roots of Policing in Uganda  British colonizers formed the paramilitary Uganda Police Force under the name “Uganda Armed Constabulary” in 1899. Officers placed in leadership positions had experience policing for British interests in Palestine, Jamaica, Gambia, Nigeria, and Kenya, qualifying them to suppress mass rebellions against the colonial government.  The only place where Negroes did not revolt is in the pages of capitalist historians C.L.R James In the early 1900’s, there were rebellions in several parts of Uganda, including Muhumza’s resistance wars to drive out Europeans, the 1907 Nyangire rebellion protesting the colonial imposition of Baganda chiefs in Bunyoro, the . . .

Capitol police officer Eugene Goodman seen holding off protesters at the U.S. Capitol and in a photo from his days as a U.S. soldier. (XVIII Airborne Corps/Twitter)

We Have To Stop Valorizing Black Cops

Policing in America is facing a PR crisis. Following the May 25th murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, the term “defund the police” has become a rallying cry for thousands across the country. Six months later, however, America has not defunded it’s police force––and in fact, has in some cases taken steps to give police departments even more money. Instead, police forces across America have taken an insidious approach: painting their departments in blackface.     After the January 6th Trump riot at the Capitol building, Yoganda Pittman, a Black woman, was named the new Chief of . . .