Revisit African Liberation Month 2022

Revisiting African Liberation Month 2022

In February 2022, the Hood Communist Collective commemorated African Liberation Month with four straight weeks of revolutionary African analysis. Here, you can find each of the pieces from that month, organized by the theme of each week. We invite you to revisit these pieces – or read them for the first time. We hope they will provide some guidance and clarity that will serve our people in our struggle for liberation. . . .

Poster calling for the release of all political prisoners in Azania (South Africa)

Political Prisoners in Azania

Any discussion about Azania has to start with an anti-colonial understanding of that region of Southern Africa. First, Azania is the original and proper name for the country commonly known as South Africa. Pan-Africanist formations like the Pan-Africanist Congress of Azania (PAC) and the Azanian People’s Organization (AZAPO), as well as Pan-Africanists worldwide, have been calling Azania that for decades. Speaking through an anti-colonial lense, the name South Africa clearly represents one imposed by those from Europe who invaded the country and have occupied it for centuries. Second, like with any settler colony i.e. the United States, Australia, occupied Palestine . . .

Display image for Hood Communist collective piece on African Liberation Month - the house is burning

The House Is Burning

As the African bourgeoisie gains more access to comforts and western privileges, the African masses continue to see a decline in their living standards. But Africa is a land that is ripe for revolution even when it can’t be immediately seen. . . .

Black Queer women lead mobilizations calling for justice for Marielle Franco

Black Queer Liberation in Brazil

Latin America’s Black and Indigenous liberation movements have served as the grassroots foundation to Latin Liberation since the inception of colonization in the region. Specifically in Brazil, which stands as example of Latin America’s Afro-Indigenous Identity, the struggle for decolonization, abolition, and Land Back is currently being carried out by some of the most marginalized, including the Black Queer community.  . . .

An anti-coup mobilization in Sudan

Conversations on the Sudan Coup

Muzan Alneel: ‘I believe it is also becoming clearer to the agents of international powers in Sudan that their “contacts” in the political club are no longer able to control the masses, or even reflect or predict their actual position. We can see them in Khartoum now, reaching out to create new “contacts” in spaces previously too radical for them to acknowledge, whether officially by meeting invitations or the usual tricks of closed meetings, support and “workshops.”’ . . .

Biden-Harris on stage

Biden-Harris and the Never-Ending Commitment to War

Upon the announcement that Joseph Biden won the 2020 elections, cities across the US erupted in celebration that fascism was defeated through a US electoral process that tamed an uprising, shafted third parties, and politicized a global pandemic. All of the consistent critical analysis of the 2020 election from revolutionary organizers, activists and left radicals that laid out the 40 year centrist-right history of Biden was silenced by whimsical beliefs of “pushing him left.” As we approach the end of Biden’s first year, the promise that Biden would “create easier conditions to organize under” has not materialized in either a . . .

Screenshot from a CNN broadcast discussing the potential of Hillary Clinton running in the 2024 US presidential election.

Hillary Clinton and the Myth of the Lesser Evil

In light of recent headlines suggesting that Hillary Clinton should return for a 2024 run at president and her ‘subtweet’ to white moderates that lacks self-awareness, HC wanted to bring back this masterful piece by Editor Onyesonwu written in 2016 to remind our readers of just who Hillary Clinton is. . . .

Group shot of South African judges - liberal democracy

The Farce of “Justice” in a Liberal Democracy

udiciary since it continues to apportion the vocation of a judge something akin to the priesthood- i.e a belief that judges epitomise fairness, righteousness, and justice. That is not so, judgeship is not just and if we continue with the reasoning that they are demigods, the tyranny of the judiciary will continue in perpetuity. . . .