Images from the Centro Fidel Castro Ruz

Crying at the Centro Fidel Castro Ruz

For most of my 10 days in Cuba I tried to play it cool, even though with it being my first real time out of the country, I felt overwhelmed the entire time. I kept it together though, for most of the trip, until our visit to the Centro Fidel Castro Ruz. It’s a museum dedicated to Fidel Castro, hero of the Cuban Revolution. And it’s a museum where I bawled my eyes out.  . . .

Eritrea Versus AFRICOM

The rapid expansion of AFRICOM on the African continent should be a cause for concern as African nations are quickly surrendering their sovereignty to the US. As the only country without a relationship to AFRICOM, Eritrea bears the brunt of US vilification. We must salute Eritrea’s ongoing project of national liberation. . . .

IFCO solidarity delegation with the Cuban people

Cuba Journal Day 1&2: “Cuban people have balls!”

The Cuban society I see today, that society that refuses to surrender its beauty, is the result of millions of Cuban people coming together and deciding they would no longer be controlled by capitalism and imperialism. . . .

CNN floating the idea that Black Lives Matter uprisings were really Russian manipulation.

Anti-Communism, Anti-Blackness, and Imperialism

In this talk prepared for the Albuquerque Anti-War Coalition’s Anti-Communism & Imperialism panel discussion, Dr. Charisse Burden Stelley discusses how anti-communism and anti-Blackness are intrinsically intertwined structures of white supremacist and capitalist control. . . .

Members of the IFCO/Pastors for Peace solidarity delegation to Cuba

Este es mi diario en Cuba (This is my diary in Cuba)

Buenas, if you are reading this and don’t know me, my name is Salifu. I am a member of the AAPRP, the Black Alliance for Peace and the Lowcountry Action Committee in Charleston, SC. This is my diary in Cuba. By the time I publish this, me and 75 other people are boarding a plane headed to Havana. On the flight with us are over two tons of medical supplies to be donated directly to the Cuban government. But the medical supplies are not what is bringing us to Cuba. As Gail Walker, the director of our delegation, has explained . . .

Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua Flags

Nicaragua, Cuba, and Venezuela: Class Warfare and Socialist Resistance

Why do Nicaragua, Cuba and Venezuela pose such an existential threat to the U.S.? Why are they able to unite all the wings of the democrat party and the republican party against them? It boils down to two factors. First, the power of their example in attempting to build independent, self-determining projects that center the material needs and interests of the people over those of capital. Second, the class warfare politics of the U.S. state. . . .

Mobilizations in support of the FSLN in Nicaragua

Why Black Revolutionaries Must Stand with the People of Nicaragua

On November 7th, the people of Nicaragua will go to the polls to reaffirm the commitment to their revolutionary democratic project, a project that began in 1979 when the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) defeated a vicious, neocolonial, gangster regime of Anastasio Somoza that was put in power by the United States. Under the leadership of the FSLN, the people of Nicaragua were able to finally control their own history and destiny. However, U.S. imperialism was not going to respect the wishes of the people. Under the neofascist president Ronald Reagan, the U.S. launched a brutal war of aggression, part . . .

The Neocolonial Collusion of HBCUs and the State

The Neocolonial Collusion of HBCUs and the State

The demonstrations at Howard and the AUC have drawn worldwide attention to these institutions projecting themselves as independent facilities in service to Black communities. The student resistance reveals the true aims of these institutions; which is to enrich private corporations and train another generation of Black and brown sellouts only interested in enriching themselves, while turning their backs on the needs of the people who fought and died to put them in school. . . .