Concerns and Grievances: The Question of Reparations

A very long list of my concerns and grievances about reparations for African descendants of slavery: 1). We should begin by critiquing an oft-recited argument made by the Right. The standard conservative deflection is that slavery “happened so long ago” and therefore “no one alive is responsible.” This line of reasoning fails to understand the relationship between anti-blackness and time. What we call “time” is, first and foremost, a human invention and social convention. We are led to believe that time always unfolds in a neat and chronological format; one that is labeled ‘beginning-middle-end’ or ‘past-present-future.’ The problem is: black . . .

Kwame Nkrumah giving a speech

Studying Nkrumah

In the development of Student Philosophical Conciousness in both colonial & settler colonial contexts, all African students everywhere can find themselves in these 3 types of students described by Kwame Nkrumah. Which one are you? Lately, I’ve been feeling this ‘personality type’ thing lately. The Feds use these systems a lot, I’m sure. They can be helpful in isolating and articulating probabilities and outcomes. I even developed a travel personality system to help folks planning to travel so they will be able to plan for a great outcome. I use it in my book, The “un”-Official Ghana Travel Guide. I . . .

Trinidad and Tobago’s independence and the importance of African centered struggles

 So much of who I am is blended into the rich colors of red, Black and white, is moved through a calypso tune and horns, steel drums and chipping on the road, is a reflection of spices and pepper sauce. As the US born daughter of two Trinis, one who loved politics and one who loves bacchanal, my identity has always been twofold, like many Black people who reside within the US.  Trinidad and Tobago’s “Together We Aspire, Together We Achieve” motto means “the hope of a people for a better life to be achieved through cooperation and working together . . .

The Importance of Organizing

Organize! Organize! Organize! The state of colonized African people in the United States is a dire one. Despite class contradictions within the Black community, the overwhelming majority of colonized Africans on the US are marginalized poor working class or a rising class of the unemployable.  Our communities are under resourced. Our communities are plagued with wage inequality, employment discrimination, housing discrimination, being under educated and mass incarceration. This is the result of intentional negligence and broken bonds by both government and private entities run mostly by white settler Americans.  How do we combat these dire conditions? As Fredrick Douglass once . . .