my gender?

pronouns are n o t  a part of the definition of my gender  Bell defines what gender means to Bell pronouns don’t define my gender  starfish, octopi, elephants, ants, bees,  blue jays, cattle, mountains, and clouds define my gender  fear no longer defines my gender  abuela thank you for your endless guidance  gender in this capitalist society is a “science”  i’ll always lean into your valiance my love for community, collective solidarity,  revolution,communalism, define my gender  Pan-Africanism is one unified Africa under scientific socialism and it’s a part of my gender  Pan-Africanism is our collective destiny  and only then we, . . .

waywardgirls:

poem: wayward girls like to dance in fugue states and laugh and giggle and twirl essay: a collective wayward by kousy louis based on “wayward lives” by saidaya hartman she defines the wayward as young black women “in open rebellion… [struggling] to create autonomous and beautiful lives, to escape the new forms of servitude awaiting them, and to live as if they were free.” anarchic and queer and nature, these mostly lumpen and working class women/girls slip out from under the boot of respectability and the abuse of their family’s power over them. they form new love, queer love, social . . .

End the illegal US Blockade on Cuba!

Imperialist Media Weaponizes ‘Nuance’ to Obscure the Blockade

Compared to the reactionary and oppressive landscape of TLGBQ+ struggles, rights, and healthcare in the U.S., the small island just 90 miles from the Florida coast, Cuba, has a national Family Code and a set of fierce national laws that prohibit all forms of discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, including the right of all people to form a family recognized by the state. Moreover, gender affirming care, which includes things like hormone replacement therapy (HRT), gender affirming surgeries, and other forms of special media care, is free for all Cuban citizens, as is the rest of their . . .

The Mirage of Mia Mottley

Mia Mottley, the current prime minister of Barbados, has emerged as one of leaders of the Global South in the 21st century in a world riddled by intersecting and worsening ecological, economic, political and social crises. Her rise to international repute has come at a time of shifting global power dynamics with the recent expansion of the BRICS, the Chinese challenge to Euro-American hegemony, the so-called ‘progressive’ turn of politics in Western democracies popularizing green new deals, climate and workers’ movements demanding transformative change and greater shares of economic gains following the COVID-19 pandemic.  At the same time, xenophobic and . . .