It’s Time To Get Canada Out of Tanzania

Canadian mining company, Barrick Gold, the second biggest gold mining company in the world,is being sued by Tanzanian residents for hiring local police killings, torture, and other violence.The violence is arguably financed and sponsored by Barrick Gold as they house, feed, and paythe local police of North Mara Acacia, Tanzania. They are basically the company’s personalsecurity, a small army. They are personally responsible for upwards of 100 murders since 2010,including that of a 5-year-old girl and the 4 women who proceeded to gather around the deadgirl. Much of the [Canadian] media has ignored this story or has left out details . . .

Africans and Identity

We want to carefully discuss our African identity because the answers we arrive at are fundamental to our Pan-Africanist objective. By defining our identity, we are defining our fighting force and ultimately we are defining the people for whom we fight. This is also the first step in the process of defining our enemy, which Sekou Touré named the “Anti-People.” These are essential definitions and in spite of the complexities involved, we have to get them right if we are to someday be free. I am sure all will agree that it will take all of us to defeat capitalism . . .

Defining White Supremacy

This article was originally published in The Routledge Handbook of Law and Society . In recent years, the concept of white supremacy has been associated with extreme racist groups and ultranationalists, as well as high-profile acts of associated racial terrorism, particularly in Western countries. Some examples are: the massacre of nine African-American worshippers at Mother Emmanuel AME Church in South Carolina (USA), the violent white nationalist march in Charlottesville, Virginia (USA), the mosque shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand that killed 51 people and injured 49, the Hanau, Germany attack that killed nine people and wounded six others, and the shooting deaths of eleven . . .

“Total Peace Is the Call”: Reflections from Colombia

Ajamu Baraka representing BAP’s Haiti/Americas Team was invited to serve as part of an international delegation of human rights defenders that would accompany the activists, community leaders, government officials, and representatives of the National Liberation Army (ELN) on a historic “humanitarian Caravan” between January 17 and the 21st to the Indigenous and Afro-Colombian areas of the Pacific coast of Colombia as part of the peace process initiated by the new government in Colombia. Ajamu was also an observer and international guarantor in Havana, Cuba during the last round of the Peace Process that produced the Ethnic Chapter of the peace . . .

Rishi Sunak: The British-Indian Obama

When British Conservative Party MPs anointed Rishi Sunak, in October last year, as their new prime minister, he effectually came to power without people having the chance to vote. He took over from Liz Truss who lasted for only 45 days. In fact, he was the third prime minister in two months, inheriting a crisis-ridden government. Many demanded a general election to end the “musical chairs at the top of government”  This was Sunak whose family avoided paying tax in Britain before he put up taxes on everyone else, the same Sunak whose wife, Akshata Murty, was forced to start . . .

Worldwide Revolutionary Black Unity: Pan-African Ideas Becoming Reality

When Teodora Gomes, an immortal leader within the African Party for the Independence of Guinea-Bissau (PAIGC), spoke there most likely wasn’t a dry eye in the room. Comrade Teodora was speaking to a room full of voting delegates present at PAIGC headquarters in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, for the first Party Congress for the All African People’s Revolutionary Party (A-APRP). There was A-APRP participation within the room from chapters and organizing areas in Guinea-Bissau, Azania (South Africa), Kenya, Ghana, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Canada, and the U.S— a pan-African vision in the making.  Widely regarded and respected within the PAIGC, A-APRP, and . . .

Why I Had To Go There: Nicaragua, Power & Protaganism

“Like a lot of Black women, I have always had to invent the power my freedom requires: All my life I’ve been studying revolution. I’ve Been looking for it, pushing at the possibilities and waiting for that moment when there’s no more room for rhetoric, for research or for reason: when there’s only my life or my death left to act upon. Here in the United States you do get weary, after a while; you could spend your best energies forever writing letters to the New York Times. But you know, in your gut, that writing back is not the . . .

Reflections From the 51st Venceremos Brigade

The first Venceremos Brigade came to Cuba in 1969, just ten years after the triumph of the Cuban revolution, making the VB the oldest Cuba solidarity group in the world. The Venceremos Brigade started when a group of young people living in the US offered to send doctors, lawyers, and teachers in support of the Cuban revolution and to protest US policy against Cuba. In response, Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro explained that Cuba didn’t need doctors, lawyers, or teachers from the US – they had their own. What Cuba needed was help harvesting sugar cane. And so the Venceremos Brigade . . .