three crumbled pieces of paper and a light bulb representing a good idea

The Myth of Good Ideas

This essay was originally published in Tenement Yaad Media, a Caribbean focused media platform.  As people who want ‘good’ for Jamaica, one of the realities that we all have to accept is that there is no objective “good” or anything that everyone will support and agree on. We have to do away with the liberal illusion of ‘objectivity’ including the ideas that debates are just about finding the best ideas, that there are things that will ‘work for all’ of us, and that maybe “our leaders” just have not thought about them yet. This type of thinking is something we . . .

Liberation Archives - The Role of Women in the Revolution by Josina Machel

The Role of Women in the Revolution

An essay by Josina Machel of FRELIMO, the Mozambique national liberation organization. It was in October 1966, in a meeting of the Central Committee, that FRELIMO decided that the Mozambican woman should take a more active part in the struggle for national liberation, at all levels. It was decided that she should receive political and military training in order to make her more capable of fulfilling whatever tasks the revolution might demand of her. Thus, a few months later, in the beginning of 1967, the first group of women from Cabo Delgado and Niassa began their training. At first this . . .

Francia Márquez Mina, a 40-year-old Black female activist in Colombia

#SoyPorqueSomos – a Black women-led Project for a New Colombia

This article was written before the March 13 primaries when Francia Marquez received more than 780,000 votes. She received more votes than any Black politician in Colombian history. Would her outstanding performance, surpassing even candidates from right-wing parties, be enough to secure her the nomination to run as vice-president candidate in the frontrunner party Pacto Historico?* Francia Márquez Mina, a 40-year-old Black female activist from the predominantly Black and forgotten region of the Colombian Pacific coast, is shifting the terms of political debate in the second ‘Blackest’ nation in South America. Francia, the first Black woman to run for the . . .

Black Myths Podcast: The Indiana Prisoner Rebellion of 1985 Pt. 2

The Indiana Prisoner Rebellion of 1985 Pt. 2

Continuing the focus on the Indiana prisoner rebellion in 1985 at the Indiana Reformatory (now Pendleton Correctional Facility), this interview spotlights Christopher “Naeem” Trotter. Trotter, in solidarity with John C. Cole aka Balagoon and their comrades, led the takeover of a cellblock inside the Indiana reformatory for 15 hours. . . .

President of Nigeria Buhari and US Secretary of State Blinken

Dis Naija na banana republic

“Dis Naija na banana republic”, is what the cab driver said to me during our trip. While the banana industry may not be the main benefactor of widespread and deepening corruption in Nigeria (it’s the oil), there is a general lack of class analysis and revolutionary consciousness owing mostly to decades-long imperialist propaganda and baked-in capitalist ideals across much of Nigerian society. The driver, a worker like myself, can point out these stark problems through generalizations e.g., ‘dis politicians dey benefit from how tings don spoil’, or can bring up specifics related to long fuel queues or poor power supply. . . .

Will Smith slapping Chris Rock at the Oscars

I’m Sick of the Oscars, Will Smith, and Chris Rock

As usual, the blatant hypocrisy of the capitalist system is so sickening it turns my stomach.  And, it should turn yours also.  Just to be clear, I don’t care one bit about Will Smith, Chris Rock, Jada Pinkett-Smith, the Oscars, the U.S. government, capitalism, any of it. I’m sick of the people claiming that Will Smith was defending African women.  If you really think a stupid, spontaneous, and emotionally generated reaction (if it was even authentic) is a strong example of defending African women than that goes a long way in explaining why African women are never defended in the . . .

Women in the Zimbabwean Revolution - Speech by Naomi Nhiwatiwa (ZANU-PF)

Women in the Zimbabwean Revolution

A speech by Naomi Nhiwatiwa of ZANU-PF given in Los Angeles, CA in July 1979 It is a very strange feeling to be a delegate from the United States of America. I was a ZANU delegate from the United States of America, therefore I carried the burden of the United States and I had to explain myself many times. I had to explain what is happening in the US and why. I told them that there were progressive people in the US who are sympathetic to our cause even though it appears that the majority of Americans seem to be supporting . . .

FILE - Protesters dance and march in New York, June 14, 2020. At no point have black trans people shared fully in the gains of racial justice or LGBTQ activism, despite suffering disproportionately from the racism, homophobia and transphobia these movements exist to combat. (Demetrius Freeman/The New York Times)

Trans women are not the enemy. Patriarchy is.

Previously published on Adventures from the Bedrooms of African Women. Two years ago, when we were planning to organize the first ever Adventures Live festival, we had invited about 7 feminists and activists from different African countries to be speakers at the event. This included an African trans woman who was invited as a speaker for one of our panel conversations. I had helped to organize travel logistics and as such had been in communication with this speaker. We communicated via email and whatsapp and I built a cordial working relationship with her. I was inspired by her work as . . .