The Unknown Relationship between Kwame Nkrumah and Malcolm X

February 21, 2021 marked the 56th commemoration of the assassination of El Hajj Malik El Shabazz aka Malcolm X in Harlem, New York.  The 24th marked the 50th commemoration of the CIA (Criminals In Action) sponsored coup that overthrew Kwame Nkrumah’s democratically elected government in Ghana.  The close historical proximity of the downfall of these Pan-African giants is not coincidental although the history of the relationship between these two men is largely ignored and/or unknown. March 6, 1957, marked the celebration of Ghana becoming the first colonized country in Africa to claim its independence from Europe. During his independence day . . .

“The First Black”

by Too Black “The First Black” the Clayface of the Black race — shape-shifted to fit the state’s mission Muddying the waters of slaughter  A farcical marvel; built by white guilt Sculpted and welded to quell a rebellion  “The First Black”  is almost always the safe Black Raised as a docile rotwild Taught to bark down at its own breed, but rarely seems to bite  the white hand that feeds “The First Black” the single needle  conveniently placed  within the colonized haystack Handpicked —  personified as the proverbial reminder, “Hey, maybe now the evil empire might have a soul???” Or . . .

Pan-Africanism: The Silver Bullet in the Heart of Empire

The world today is dominated by capitalism and imperialism. Western powers such as the United States, France, and Britain have amassed vast fortunes through mechanisms of violence and terror that have displaced peoples around the globe. Namely, African people have been scattered far and wide by slavery and colonialism. Nonetheless, the African Diaspora maintains cultural and political connections to the homeland and each other wherever their communities are found. The material conditions, political traditions, histories, and cultural productions shared between the communities of African Diaspora have come to form the Pan-African Movement. Through Pan-Africanism, “the gather[ing] of the masses of . . .

An African woman resists the police at anti-Museveni protests in Uganda

Extending the Imagination of African Gender Thought

African women combat unique oppression. Cisheteropatriarchy, racial capitalism, colorism, and so forth. However, there are specific historical and cultural realities many African women exist within that are distinct to continental African women. . . .

Africans protest racist conditions produced by Zionist in occupied Palestine.

Zionism’s Shrewd Manipulation of African Movements

Clearly, a movement based upon justice can never cut deals with the forces that oppress their people, especially when those deals are designed to increase repression against the people in order to hurry along a political objective. Yet that’s exactly what the zionist movement did and its what it continued to do by manipulating African movements for justice against white supremacy. . . .

African children at a rally to free political prisoners organized by the Black Panther Party.

An Analysis of the “Free Huey” Speech by Kwame Turé

In “Free Huey,” Kwame Turé underlines the concept of survival. Turé argues that the survival “of a race of people…is all that is at stake”. By establishing this, Turé discusses the roles that resistance, the vote (its futility, rather), allyship, and ideologies play in contributing to survival. . . .

History is a Weapon of Struggle: Build African Liberation Month

As Black History Month 2013 begins, we are re-posting this piece by Ajamu Nangwaya.  We are now in February and for Africans in North America it is a significant month. It is usually observed as Black History Month. It is taken as an opportunity to acknowledge African people’s struggles, achievements and commemorate significant moments in the fight against white supremacy, capitalism, sexism and other forms of oppression. Some of us use this month to reflect and rededicate ourselves to the revolutionary or radical African political tradition. In the spirit of collective self-criticism, are we at the point where Black History . . .

Fidel Castro and Maurice Bishop in Cuba

Cuba and the Struggle for Black Liberation

Black people have had a long, brutal, and disgusting history in the US & Cuba because of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade which is connected to colonialism that then became imperialism in the 20th century. The Spanish were the ones to first establish a population of enslaved Africans to begin working on  exports that would be used to enrich the colonizers in the 16th century. The genesis of enslaved Africans first coming  into Cuba could be traced to 1511 when Diego Velasquez conquered the island of Cuba in 1511-12. One  cannot talk about slavery in Cuba without mentioning the Spanish and . . .