Graffiti on a sidewalk says "abolish the police"

On Police Abolition: Decolonization Is The Only Way

If Black masses are semi-colonized, the solution is decolonization. If slavery was merely reformed, slavery must be abolished in all its iterations. The U.S. police are the representation and manifestation of modern-day slave patrols. For these reasons and others, the police must be abolished in their entirety and other carceral institutions as well. . . .

The Black petty-bourgeoisie

The Class Collaboration of “Justice”

There’s no intent on clarifying that this is a concession won by the mobilizing of millions of working people around the country who marched, fought in the streets and burned down precincts. Instead, the Black petty-bourgeoisie media is attempting to convince the masses of working-class Black people that this is a sign that the system can work for us. . . .

Urban design and agriculture in Cuba

City Planners and Revolution

What is the role of the planner in the revolution for Black liberation? Do regional and city planners even have a role? Community building will be necessary to life post revolution. Cities that are centered around love and meeting the needs of the people are vital. . . .

Flyer for the August 21 & September 9th National “Shut’em Down” Demos

In The Spirit of Abolition, Let’s Shut’em Down!

A call to action. National “Shut’em Down” demonstrations are called for August 21st and September 9th. Originally published on the Jailhouse Lawyers Speak blog. . . .

Community Control of Police v Defunding Police: Addressing the Patriarchal Roots of Policing

Community Control for who? We still have too many hierarchies and contradictions within the Black community to ensure a subset of people with police power would not replicate the same violent institution power. The problem with policing is not who controls it or who can enforce its protocols. The problem with policing is that policing is inherently violent and always patriarchal. Campaigns like #sayhername (though co-opted/erased/reduced to now include #sayhisname) was a recognition that non-cishet men experience police violence. The violence may not be out in the open or in the streets, recording on a cell phone, or public in . . .