Shot from African Liberation Day organized by the Thomas Sankara Center in Burkina Faso

Neo-Colonialism is Inherently Patriarchal

I was asked to talk about women fighting for Pan-African unity against neo-colonialism but one of the things that came up on our call when I was preparing for this was neo-colonialism as an inherently patriarchal system of exploitation. So I want to begin by talking about the ways in which neo-colonialism is inherently patriarchal. As we may know, colonialism and neo-colonialism impact every facet of life for colonized peoples so there is no way to analyze any aspect of our lives while ignoring the reality of neo-colonialism and imperialism, but since neo-colonialism is fundamentally an economic system, I want . . .

From Black Power to Pan-Africanism with Mukasa Dada

From Black Power to Pan-Africanism with Mukasa Dada

Transcript Mukasa Dada, formally known as Willie Ricks, when he was a member of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC – pronounced SNICK), was a frontline organizer who faced naked terror in the 1960s engaging in organizing work against white supremacy. In June of 1966, Mukasa played a pivotal during the “March against Fear” in Mississippi.  Moving away from much of the philosophy of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. which, up to that point, dominated the ideology and actions of the U.S. civil rights movement, SNCC saw itself further embracing the militant ideas of Malcolm X and nationalism as . . .

Liberation Archives: Shirley Graham Du Bois- The Mistake of the First African Summit Conference

The Mistake of the First African Summit Conference – Shirley Graham DuBois

This is an excerpt from a speech given by the great Shirely Graham DuBois at UCLA on November 13, 1970, almost a decade after the African Summit Conference in Ethiopia where Pan-Africanists from all over the world came together to sign the Charter of African Unity. You can listen to the section below here, or the entire speech here.  . . .

A picture of a destroyed city street in Libya, a north African nation invated by NATO

NATO in Africa: Colonial Violence and Structural White Supremacy

Considering the public media attention and concern about possible expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), it is worth reminding people about NATO’s bloody history in Africa. NATO was founded in 1949 after WWII at a time when African countries were still under the yoke of colonialism. In fact most of the original founders of NATO had been Africa’s principal colonizers such as UK, France, Portugal, Belgium, Italy and the USA as lead NATO organizer and dominant partner. The organization was established as a collective defense against the Soviet Union with the requirement (Article 5) that any attack on . . .

An African student stands over another and says "like it or not, you're from Africa."

Individualism & the Attack on African Identity

African identity is much more than glamorizing our past. For proponents of Pan-Africanism it’s really a recognition that there are 2 billion Africans worldwide, living in 120 countries and in each of those countries we occupy the bottom of society. And, at the core of this is the continued subjugation of Africa.  . . .

World map, illustration

Blockchain Technology & Coercive Surveillance of the Global South

June 2021, Twitter’s Jack Dorsey vocalized his support of Project Mano, a group of Ethiopia-based entrepreneurs who want to get the Ethiopian government to consider mining and storing Bitcoin. This was several days after El Salvador made Bitcoin a legal tender and Tanzanian President Sulhulu urged the country’s central bank to adopt Bitcoin and cryptocurrency. Since then, Panama, Brasil, Argentina, Mexico, and Paraguay have all drafted legislation to adopt cryptocurrency. In addition to that, the founder of Cardano, Charles Hoskinson, has expressed his interest in bringing Cardano to El Salvador. . . .

African Financial Independence is a Threat to the Status Quo and not a Pipedream.

African Financial Independence is a Threat to Imperialism

The deeper issues are usually traced to colonial economic interactions and the introduction of capitalism in developing countries. There were concerted efforts to build and maintain economic relations, in which the colonies were made into permanent producers of raw materials to satisfy the requirements of metropolitan countries. The established links between the producers and the colonial metropoles meant that colonies became dependent on other countries to purchase and dictate the prices of products. Colonies, as a result, were left without the infrastructure to process the raw materials and only purchased ready-made goods from the associated colonial power. The result was that colonies produced what they did not consume and consumed what they did not produce. . . .

Fascism Born in the Colonies, Not Europe

African revolutionaries like George Padmore, W.E.B. Dubois, and most famously Aime Cesaire, declared that what happened in Europe was that colonial practices that were applied in the colonies were now being applied or were applied in Europe. . . .