Shot from African Liberation Day organized by the Thomas Sankara Center in Burkina Faso

Neo-Colonialism is Inherently Patriarchal

I was asked to talk about women fighting for Pan-African unity against neo-colonialism but one of the things that came up on our call when I was preparing for this was neo-colonialism as an inherently patriarchal system of exploitation. So I want to begin by talking about the ways in which neo-colonialism is inherently patriarchal. As we may know, colonialism and neo-colonialism impact every facet of life for colonized peoples so there is no way to analyze any aspect of our lives while ignoring the reality of neo-colonialism and imperialism, but since neo-colonialism is fundamentally an economic system, I want . . .

Photo of Affiong L. Affiong on the Liberation Archives template with text that reads "DINNER AT THE OBAMA INN"

Dining at the Obama Inn

ON 17 MAY, THE VENERABLE New York Times reported: “Mr. Obama will travel to Accra, the capital of Ghana, on July 10 for an overnight stop at the end of a trip that will first take him to Moscow to meet with Russian leaders and then Sardinia for the annual summit of the G8 powers. The president and Mrs. Obama look forward to strengthening the US relationship with one of our most trusted partners in sub-Saharan Africa, and to highlighting the critical role that sound governance and civil society play in promoting lasting development …” Yes, Obama-ists around the globe . . .

Black Maternal Health Week banner - for African birthing people

Black Birthing People Need Our Support

Black Maternal Health Week is a week of information sharing, panel discussions, and uplifting Black Birthing People usually falling on the second week of April each year. For about the last 5 years this week has grown into a larger scale event from one or two days to a full week of events. As a community, we should be able to support our Black Birthing people from conception to postpartum and beyond.  . . .

Liberation Archives: Shirley Graham Du Bois- The Mistake of the First African Summit Conference

The Mistake of the First African Summit Conference – Shirley Graham DuBois

This is an excerpt from a speech given by the great Shirely Graham DuBois at UCLA on November 13, 1970, almost a decade after the African Summit Conference in Ethiopia where Pan-Africanists from all over the world came together to sign the Charter of African Unity. You can listen to the section below here, or the entire speech here.  . . .

Amy Jacques Garvey - Liberation Archives - Women as Leaders

Women as Leaders

The exigencies of this present age require that women take their places beside their men. White women are rallying all their forces and uniting regardless of national boundaries to save their race from destruction, and preserve its ideals for posterity. . . . White men have begun to realize that as women are the backbone of the home, so can they, by their economic experience and their aptitude for details, participate effectively in guiding the destiny of nation and race. No line of endeavor remains closed for long to the modern woman. She agitates for equal opportunities and gets them; . . .

Women in the Haitian Revolution

The 1791 slave uprising of Saint-Domingue was the largest and most successful slave revolt in modern history. It transformed one of the wealthiest colonies in the world into a new nation led by the black leaders of the Revolution. Because Saint-Domingue was a French colony, the French Revolution was inextricably linked to the Revolution in Saint-Domingue, however, the two Revolutions functioned in largely separate spheres not least because of the ocean that separated them. The struggle for liberation took on a particularly bloody and brutal shape on the island of Saint-Domingue. Along with other French Caribbean colonies (such as Martinique . . .

Women of the PAIGC in Guinea BIssau

The African Woman: The Invisible Soldier

A society without women can be compared to humans without air. Africa without African women is like a mango tree without roots. The indispensable role that African women play in the development of society in general and community, in particular, cannot be matched or debated. However, despite this role African women from Toronto to Harare to London to Kingston find themselves often invisible. . . .

Revolutionary African woman Assata Shakur

Working-Class African Women in Revolution

It is the purpose of this piece to provide historical examples of how working-class African women, joined and supported by working-class African men, combatted the shackles of racism, colonialism, and imperialism regardless of their geographical position. We will use the women of Dahomey, Assata Shakur, and Claudia Jones as examples of significant working-class women who contributed greatly to African Liberation. . . .