Graphic depiction of people at a protest

The Limits of “Lived Experience”

The commonly retorted, “Listen to the people of [insert group]” statement is void of analyzing the class character of the people and voices being elevated. This places emphasis on individuals and not what is actually occurring, because the lens to view it through is blurred by varying interests. This is the exact issue with relying on lived experience as an analytical tool. . . .

An African women's mobilization for Pan-African Women's Day

Origins and Objectives of Pan-African Women’s Day

Presented by Comrade Debora Soares da Gama, A-APRP Pre-Cadre; militant of the Amilcar Cabral African Youth (JAAC) serving on its Secretariat for Zone 4 of Bissau; and Pre-Cadre of the PAIGC Amilcar Cabral Political Ideological Training School. Origin of Pan-African Women’s Day Pan-African Women’s Day was founded on 31 July 1962, Dar-es-Salaam (Tanganyika), following recommendations of the All African Women’s Conference (AAWC) – Conférence des femmes africaines (CFA). that took place in July 1961, in Conakry, People’s Revolutionary Republic of Guinea. Prior to this conference, it was resolved to organize African Women’s Conferences each areas, (Liberation Movements and Independent African . . .

African Liberation Day: We Unify or We Die

#AfricanLiberationDay: We Unify or We Die

African people’s struggle against oppression, colonialism, zionism, and imperialism is commemorated each year with African Liberation Day. Founded on April 15th,1958 by Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, the First Conference of Independent States was held in Accra, Ghana, and attended by eight independent African states. It aimed to create awareness and amplify decolonization struggles and symbolize African nations’ determination to free themselves from foreign domination and exploitation. . . .

A picture of PAIGC leader, Amilcar Cabral

Revolutionary Pan-Africanist Amilcar Cabral Considered the 2nd Greatest Leader of Humanity

At the beginning of this year, BBC World Histories Magazine asked historians to nominate the ‘greatest leader’ –someone who exercised power and had a positive impact on humanity – and to explore their achievements and legacy. More than 5,000 readers voted, and in second place, with 25 per cent of the vote is Amilcar Cabral, who as head of the African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC), led his country to independence. What made Cabral great? Why must those who struggle for Pan-Africanism know and understand this man’s life, work and legacy? Let’s examine his contributions. . . .