A group of Black women.

Let Go of the Idea of the ‘Strong Black Woman’

I have seen too many of us who wanted to be a “strong Black woman” so badly that we denied ourselves the pleasure of emotional acknowledgment, refusing to accept we needed help in the name of such “strength.” This fallacy of strength attached to Blackness diminishes our well-being and hurts us more than it empowers us. . . .

African women gathered in a front of a banner that says "Women's liberation"

Africana Womanism vs. Black Feminism

Africana Womanism and Black Feminism are two different approaches that attempt to redefine and contextualize the experiences of African/Black women. Though both of these ideologies underscore Black women’s experiences, the principles and methods of these two approaches differ and sometimes conflict. . . .

Cuban propaganda celebrating revolutionary African women

Celebrating Revolutionary African Women

This month the editors of Hood Communist will be celebrate revolutionary African working class women and their contributions to the struggle for African liberation. To kick off the celebration, here are five revolutionary African women you should know. . . .

An African woman resists the police at anti-Museveni protests in Uganda

Extending the Imagination of African Gender Thought

African women combat unique oppression. Cisheteropatriarchy, racial capitalism, colorism, and so forth. However, there are specific historical and cultural realities many African women exist within that are distinct to continental African women. . . .

Pseudo Black Nationalism; Toxic Masculinity & Homophobia

Black Nationalism at face value has its honored place in history.  Despite the efforts by racist Europeans and accommodating negroes to denounce it for centuries, the concept of Black Nationalism has always been a survival tool for the African masses.  As Sekou Ture eloquently points out in his classic and widely missed analysis of “Negritude,” Black Nationalism was African people’s response to colonialism and slavery.  Since a major component of institutionalizing those racist systems was for the bourgeois to develop and nurture the concept of white supremacy, Black Nationalism has always been our way of deconstructing racist ideology and proclaiming . . .

A flyer on a telephone pole warning folks in Austin, Texas about Brandon Darby, a onetime leftist activist who eventually became an FBI informant.

Why Misogynists Make Great Informants

This piece on gender violence in social justice movements was originally published in make/shift magazine’s Spring/Summer 2010 issue and written by Courtney Desiree Morris. In January 2009, activists in Austin, Texas, learned that one of their own, a white activist named Brandon Darby, had infiltrated groups protesting the Republican National Convention (RNC) as an FBI informant. Darby later admitted to wearing recording devices at planning meetings and during the convention. He testified on behalf of the government in the February 2009 trial of two Texas activists who were arrested at the RNC on charges of making and possessing Molotov cocktails, . . .

Rest in Power, Toyin Salau

For Toyin Salau

I feel a great rage for the African man that violated Toyin and took her life, but I understand he is a pure creation of the most evil global enemy this planet has ever known. He is a victim in his own way, doomed to a cycle of violence that only total revolution will break, though maybe too late for him. I feel a profound sadness and grief for Toyin’s light extinguished too soon but I also know that there will be many many thousands more women and girls who will suffer like her – new ones every day – until we defeat this enemy once and for all. . . .

About Love And A Revolution

About Love And A Revolution

Love and abuse cannot coexist. Even while knowing this, people weaponize love as a silencer to harm, in the name of unity. How can harm benefit community? How could silence benefit community? . . .