The Black petty-bourgeoisie

The Class Collaboration of “Justice”

There’s no intent on clarifying that this is a concession won by the mobilizing of millions of working people around the country who marched, fought in the streets and burned down precincts. Instead, the Black petty-bourgeoisie media is attempting to convince the masses of working-class Black people that this is a sign that the system can work for us. . . .

Mushroom cloud at the end of the world.

The End of the Fucking World

the end of the fucking world came again in May that year,
nine minutes and twenty nine seconds
stretched to hours, broke to days, forced into months.
and it sounded the same way the end of the world always sounds . . .

A demonstrator in Minneapolis illustrating what justice actually looks like

Derek Chauvin & the Con Against African Justice

Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. slave catcher (police) who brutally murdered George Floyd a year ago while being videotaped doing so, was convicted today. At the very least, the convictions will require him to spend a significant amount of time in prison, if not the rest of his mortal life. Regardless, read no further if you expect us to find some reason to celebrate. . . .

Ujima People's Progress Party calls out the Black misleadership class.

The Black Working Class Must Defend Itself, Not the Black Misleadership Class

Black working-class people must be clear that it is not corruption that undermines the self-determination and equitable treatment of the Black community and working-class people but instead the broad daylight administration of policies, laws, and institutions that protect profits gained by exploiting Black labor, Black lives and resources. . . .

Kelly Davis, wife of Keith Davis Jr., leads a protest.

Kelly Davis: The Wife That Won’t Go Away

Last year when Keith Davis Jr. was sentenced to 50 years in prison for a murder he did not commit, his wife Kelly Davis made a commitment to fight. The fight that Kelly has committed to is one with many moving pieces— it’s a fight to preserve her own sanity, a fight to raise her children, a fight to get up every day and go to work, a fight to hold on to her marriage, and a fight against the racist and corrupt Baltimore political establishment. For many African women and non-men, it’s a storied fight, old as our arrival . . .

Michelle Obama stands next to Barack Obama and points at the inauguration

African Women, Don’t Be a Mammy for Empire

All too often these days we are witnessing petit-bourgeois African women willingly taking positions of leadership, power, and influence within the political and military infrastructure of the United States. Positions that require, as part of their job descriptions, acts of extreme ongoing violence against the world’s most oppressed populations, including their own people. . . .

Feminism & Women’s Liberation Are Not Imperialist

In modern-day politics, figures such as Meghan Markle, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Michelle Obama, and Kamala Harris are seen as heroes of our times who have overcome the odds in order to make the world a better place for women everywhere. By taking up space in male-dominated settings, they are sending the message that they’re a force to be reckoned with. Powerful. Commanding. In control. However, this doesn’t automatically mean that they’re making progress on behalf of women everywhere. . . .

Pictures of Somali at a protest.

The Historical Roots of the Somali Election Crisis

Elections in the Somali capital of Muqdisho have been delayed due to disagreements between the President and the opposition – a coalition of regional governors and prominent national politicians, including the recently removed premier and two former presidents. This essay argues that the recurring political crisis between different ruling-class factions and between Muqdisho and the provinces has its roots not in the ideological afterlives of a pre-colonial ‘tribal’ mode of living – as per the dominant narrative, but in the country’s integration into the global capitalist-imperialist system since the late 19th century, and especially since the neoliberal recolonisation of the country in the aftermath of the 1977–78 Ogaden War. . . .