Cuban propaganda celebrating revolutionary African women

Celebrating Revolutionary African Women

This month the editors of Hood Communist will be celebrate revolutionary African working class women and their contributions to the struggle for African liberation. To kick off the celebration, here are five revolutionary African women you should know. . . .

Fidel Castro and Maurice Bishop in Cuba

Cuba and the Struggle for Black Liberation

Black people have had a long, brutal, and disgusting history in the US & Cuba because of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade which is connected to colonialism that then became imperialism in the 20th century. The Spanish were the ones to first establish a population of enslaved Africans to begin working on  exports that would be used to enrich the colonizers in the 16th century. The genesis of enslaved Africans first coming  into Cuba could be traced to 1511 when Diego Velasquez conquered the island of Cuba in 1511-12. One  cannot talk about slavery in Cuba without mentioning the Spanish and . . .

Pan-African and International Solidarity will Break Sanctions

Not one European colonizer or settler-colonist brought land to the African continent. They stole it when they arrived. Consequently, it is not only logical but just, that Africans take the land back. Because British settlers stole Zimbabwe territory and called it “Rhodesia” as a tribute to racist Cecil Rhodes, Africans fought a long, fierce armed struggle. After seizing state power in 1980, Africans re-named the country Zimbabwe. For the next 20 years, the Zimbabwean government under the leadership of the heroic Robert Mugabe was widely praised by the west. However, all of that changed when, in the year 2000, the . . .

Protests against US Sanctions in Zimbabwe

Sanctions Kill: The Devastating Human Cost of Sanctions

Sanctions don’t defend justice or human rights. They are an illegal, immoral, and terrorist act of war, applied against civilians, and inflicting the greatest suffering on the most vulnerable, including children, pregnant women, the ill, elderly, and disabled. . . .

A group shot featuring just a portion of the African contingent of the 50th anniversary Venceremos Brigade

African Solidarity with the Cuban Revolution

Fourteen days ago I was in Cuba, one of 160ish people there for the Venceremos Brigade – a solidarity delegation celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The VB was started half a century ago, a first of its kind internationalist mission created by youth living and struggling in the United States who wanted to show their solidarity with the Cuban Revolution. The Brigade has shown up in many sizes and forms over the years but at its core it remains about people to people anti-imperialist solidarity in direct action form. The VB is an act of collective support for Cuba’s . . .