African nationalism on display in Guinea

African Nationalism is not European Nationalism. Stop Projecting.

Everyday, everywhere on Earth, some European is coming into spaces with African people (or Indigenous people of the Western Hemisphere) to express their perspective that nationalism is a primitive form of human consciousness. Even most of these people who claim to support national liberation for colonized people still see any semblance of national identity as reactionary and contrary to forward human progress.  We have the European socialist left to primarily thank for this racism disguised as class analysis. How and why do we call nationalism racist? Mostly because the basis of this inept analysis is that the history of Europe . . .

Initiation Oath of the Mau Mau Movement, Kenya

Why We Need A Mau Mau in Amerikkka

During a speech delivered in 1964, Malcolm X made a profound assertion about a rebel group that fought against British colonialism in East Africa known to many as the Mau Mau.  “We need  a Mau Mau revolution in Mississippi, we need a Mau Mau revolution in Alabama, we need a Mau Mau revolution in Georgia, and we need a Mau Mau revolution in Harlem.” . . .

Malcolm X: a fighter for People(s)-Centered Human Rights

People(s)-Centered Human Rights & Malcolm X

Originally published on Pambazuka. There was something quite different with Malcolm’s approach to human rights that distinguished him from mainstream civil rights activists. By grounding himself in the radical human rights approach, Malcolm articulated a position on human rights struggle that did not contain itself to just advocacy. He understood that appealing to the same powers that were responsible for the structures of oppression was a dead end. Fifty-six years ago on February 21st, the world lost the great anti-colonial fighter, Malcolm X. Around the world, millions pause on this anniversary and take note of the life and contribution of . . .

an African family celebrating thankstaking

Thankstaking & The Normalizing of Colonialism

The key to oppressing a people is to break their spirit.  And, the way to break a people’s spirit is to destroy their connection to their culture.  A significant piece of white supremacy is to deny the Indigenous story.  Doing so diminishes them just as denying slavery is a clear attack against the dignity of African people.  The more we do to challenge this attack against oppressed people in every form we can, the more we weaken imperialism’s ability to control the thinking of the masses of people.cu . . .

HC RADIO: Zimbabwe Against The West

Hood Communist RADIO: Zimbabwe Against The West

In this episode, we sit down with a baddd African and long- time organizer Obi Egbuna Jr. to re-examine Zimbabwe, the politics of Southern Africa and Robert Mugabe a bit closer, pushing back on the narratives that have long existed as a way to sustain the ongoing sanctions against the nation.  . . .

An African holds a piece of lettuce.

Unreading Colonial Food Systems

Originally published in the August 2021 Out of Print Newsletter by the Noname Reads Book Club ︎︎Like many people who went through U.S. public school systems, I am intimately familiar with institutional food; canned vegetables, square cut pizza, frozen & highly processed mystery meats, syrupy fruit cups, all of that. Institutional food is low-cost, low in nutritional value, and arguably pretty gross. I remember asking our school superintendent why our cafeteria wasn’t able to purchase food from the vibrant community of local farmers. He told me that our school was bound up in a large multi-year contract with a number . . .

Graffiti on a sidewalk says "abolish the police"

On Police Abolition: Decolonization Is The Only Way

If Black masses are semi-colonized, the solution is decolonization. If slavery was merely reformed, slavery must be abolished in all its iterations. The U.S. police are the representation and manifestation of modern-day slave patrols. For these reasons and others, the police must be abolished in their entirety and other carceral institutions as well. . . .