Thoughts On Abolition

Politics can change and evolve. Considering the dialectical nature of embodied knowledge or ‘lived experience’ and politics, it is imperative to acknowledge that these processes inherently demand change and evolution. In other words, what one strongly believes can be reconsidered and analyzed alongside objective material analysis, as both are theoretically in a constant state of development. Since 2020, there has been a gradual realization about the limitations of various strategies, ideologies, and political approaches, particularly in the context of using “abolition” as a catch-all umbrella. To grasp the U.S. state in its specific and complex dimensions, one needs to recognize . . .

An Exercise in Dialectics 

In both classical physics and quantum physics dialectics involves the propensity of material and immaterial things to move. This motion is responsible for the development of both the material and the immaterial and their transformation from one state to another. Motion is the mode of existence of all real things. This motion is the result of struggle and contradiction between the positive and negative forces within everything. The resulting motion is of two types: movement through time/space and movement or transformation from one state to another. In classical physics, a thing is what it is: a plant, a rock, or . . .

Kwame Nkrumah giving a speech to African heads of state at the founding of the Organization of African Unity

The Enemy’s Unity vs. African Unity

Unity has been the watchword for Africa’s enemies. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) united countries engaged in colonialism and imperialism under the leadership of the United States. NATO’s role in Africa has been to defend the United States and Western Europe’s economic dominance over Africa’s land and resources. As just one example, NATO supported fascist Portugal with planes, ships, and arms in the fight to preserve colonies in the 1960s and 1970s. NATO remains a threat to Africa and the world. Under the leadership of U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM), Africa’s enemies united and used military force to attempt to . . .

Artist's depiction of how increasingly privatized higher education is sucking public resources African and colonized communities need.

Class Struggle & Higher Education

The revived discourse around student loan forgiveness has created a forest for the tree moment, yet again, in how the masses react to what is purported to be incremental “wins.” The Biden administration recently announced that the federal government will forgive $10,000 in student loan debt for Americans making less than $125,000 annually as well as extend the student loan repayment moratorium. This announcement is in stark difference to the campaign Biden ran on, yet this offering is being oversold by mainstream media pundits and journalists ultimately causing mass confusion about what is happening in and with higher education. Granted, . . .

Kenyan women protest against misogyny and for their liberation

Misogyny and Homophobia in Kenyan Leftist Spaces

The rallying cry you will hear at almost every leftist gathering in Kenya is “Liberation for the masses! End all forms of oppression!” Often, it is men who send out this noble clarion call for emancipation from the shackles of capitalism and all the ills it represents. But, whose liberation is it anyway? What oppression are we ending when many leftist movements in Kenya harbor persons who hold on to harmful patriarchal attitudes like misogyny and homophobia? . . .

Graphic depiction of people at a protest

The Limits of “Lived Experience”

The commonly retorted, “Listen to the people of [insert group]” statement is void of analyzing the class character of the people and voices being elevated. This places emphasis on individuals and not what is actually occurring, because the lens to view it through is blurred by varying interests. This is the exact issue with relying on lived experience as an analytical tool. . . .