my gender?

pronouns are n o t  a part of the definition of my gender  Bell defines what gender means to Bell pronouns don’t define my gender  starfish, octopi, elephants, ants, bees,  blue jays, cattle, mountains, and clouds define my gender  fear no longer defines my gender  abuela thank you for your endless guidance  gender in this capitalist society is a “science”  i’ll always lean into your valiance my love for community, collective solidarity,  revolution,communalism, define my gender  Pan-Africanism is one unified Africa under scientific socialism and it’s a part of my gender  Pan-Africanism is our collective destiny  and only then we, . . .

The Real Crisis of Black Manhood

The Real Crisis of Black Manhood

The current fight against the feminization of Black men is a fight to sustain an oppressive status quo of female degradation and subjugation, it’s not about preserving Black manhood. First off we need to understand that: Black manhood has never even existed in the USA! We were not men under chattel slavery, we were not even recognized as human. After emancipation and during the Reconstruction era we simply imitated the roles, behaviors, standards, dress, and values of white men, that’s all we had known as Black men in the US for over 200 years. White men were our only reference . . .

Liberation Archives - The Role of Women in the Revolution by Josina Machel

The Role of Women in the Revolution

An essay by Josina Machel of FRELIMO, the Mozambique national liberation organization. It was in October 1966, in a meeting of the Central Committee, that FRELIMO decided that the Mozambican woman should take a more active part in the struggle for national liberation, at all levels. It was decided that she should receive political and military training in order to make her more capable of fulfilling whatever tasks the revolution might demand of her. Thus, a few months later, in the beginning of 1967, the first group of women from Cabo Delgado and Niassa began their training. At first this . . .

A National Women's Day march in Azania (South Africa)

Revolutionary African Culture for an End to Gender-Based Violence

ur focus must be on ideological and political development of the masses. The enemies of our people are in our midst and only mass, revolutionary African culture and organization can combat this reactionary behavior. We must collectively reconstruct not only the ethical and political foundation for a new African society but also reinvigorate revolutionary and principled people willing to build an ethical and principled society for the future of Africa and all our African communities. . . .

African women gathered in a front of a banner that says "Women's liberation"

Africana Womanism vs. Black Feminism

Africana Womanism and Black Feminism are two different approaches that attempt to redefine and contextualize the experiences of African/Black women. Though both of these ideologies underscore Black women’s experiences, the principles and methods of these two approaches differ and sometimes conflict. . . .

A flyer on a telephone pole warning folks in Austin, Texas about Brandon Darby, a onetime leftist activist who eventually became an FBI informant.

Why Misogynists Make Great Informants

This piece on gender violence in social justice movements was originally published in make/shift magazine’s Spring/Summer 2010 issue and written by Courtney Desiree Morris. In January 2009, activists in Austin, Texas, learned that one of their own, a white activist named Brandon Darby, had infiltrated groups protesting the Republican National Convention (RNC) as an FBI informant. Darby later admitted to wearing recording devices at planning meetings and during the convention. He testified on behalf of the government in the February 2009 trial of two Texas activists who were arrested at the RNC on charges of making and possessing Molotov cocktails, . . .

Abolition Beyond The Binary

“The prison, therefore, functions ideologically as an abstract site into which undesirables are deposited, relieving us of the responsibility of thinking about the real issues afflicting those communities from which prisoners are drawn in such disproportionate numbers. This is the ideological work that the prison performs—it relieves us of the responsibility of seriously engaging with the problems of our society, especially those produced by racism and, increasingly, global capitalism.” Angela Y. Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete? According to the Prison Policy Initiative, the American criminal justice system currently holds almost 2.3 million people in 1,719 state prisons, 109 federal prisons, 1,772 . . .