An anti-coup mobilization in Sudan

Conversations on the Sudan Coup

Muzan Alneel: ‘I believe it is also becoming clearer to the agents of international powers in Sudan that their “contacts” in the political club are no longer able to control the masses, or even reflect or predict their actual position. We can see them in Khartoum now, reaching out to create new “contacts” in spaces previously too radical for them to acknowledge, whether officially by meeting invitations or the usual tricks of closed meetings, support and “workshops.”’ . . .

A meme depicting different aspects of neo-colonialism, of which the IMF is a part..

How the IMF Exploits African Nations

It’s difficult to understand why our new government leaders are celebrating getting on to an International Monetary Fund (IMF) programme. It reminds me of the PF government’s celebrations over getting the Euro bonds. Can one really celebrate getting kaloba! Is that something to really celebrate? . . .

Poverty in the US: a food bank line.

Poverty & Capitalism: Who Is the “Poor”?

In every country of the world, there are people living in poverty. Even in the world’s richest countries the poorest people often live in poor housing and struggle to afford basic goods and services like heating, transport, and healthy food for themselves and their families. Based on a broad definition, poverty can be considered a state or condition in which a person or community lacks the financial resources and essentials for a minimum standard of living. Poverty means that the income level from employment is so low that basic human needs can’t be met. Those who are in monetary poverty . . .

African Financial Independence is a Threat to the Status Quo and not a Pipedream.

African Financial Independence is a Threat to Imperialism

The deeper issues are usually traced to colonial economic interactions and the introduction of capitalism in developing countries. There were concerted efforts to build and maintain economic relations, in which the colonies were made into permanent producers of raw materials to satisfy the requirements of metropolitan countries. The established links between the producers and the colonial metropoles meant that colonies became dependent on other countries to purchase and dictate the prices of products. Colonies, as a result, were left without the infrastructure to process the raw materials and only purchased ready-made goods from the associated colonial power. The result was that colonies produced what they did not consume and consumed what they did not produce. . . .