World map, illustration

Blockchain Technology & Coercive Surveillance of the Global South

June 2021, Twitter’s Jack Dorsey vocalized his support of Project Mano, a group of Ethiopia-based entrepreneurs who want to get the Ethiopian government to consider mining and storing Bitcoin. This was several days after El Salvador made Bitcoin a legal tender and Tanzanian President Sulhulu urged the country’s central bank to adopt Bitcoin and cryptocurrency. Since then, Panama, Brasil, Argentina, Mexico, and Paraguay have all drafted legislation to adopt cryptocurrency. In addition to that, the founder of Cardano, Charles Hoskinson, has expressed his interest in bringing Cardano to El Salvador. . . .

Haiti’s White Rulers Have Spoken on Haiti’s Political Future

The Black Alliance for Peace (BAP) condemns the arrogance and illegality of United Nations Special Envoy for Haiti Helen La Lime’s July 8 statement that Haitian Prime Minister Claude Joseph will be the new president, just one day after the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse. The decision was announced to the press after a closed-door UN Security Council meeting had been called on Haiti. But BAP asks: Who gave the United Nations special envoy the power to make that kind of determination for the people of Haiti? This sounds like a play right out of the old regime-change book. As . . .

A protestor holds a sign at a Canada Day protest.

The Connection Between “No Pride in Genocide” and “FUCK the Fourth”

During the first week in July within the United Snakes, this side of the arbitrary colonial border, you will hear about a lot of events/demonstrations called, “FUCK the Fourth.” These events/demonstrations have historically been organized within Black Radical Tradition in true principled solidarity with the Indigenous people of the western hemisphere, their collective sovereignty, and their continued and consistent struggle against the active colonization of their land, since first contact with European pillagers.  “FUCK the Fourth” events/demonstrations are centered around abandoning the practices of our oppressors, observing the traditions of our Ancestors, and celebrating ourselves as Africans forced into diaspora. . . .

Women of the PAIGC in Guinea BIssau

The African Woman: The Invisible Soldier

A society without women can be compared to humans without air. Africa without African women is like a mango tree without roots. The indispensable role that African women play in the development of society in general and community, in particular, cannot be matched or debated. However, despite this role African women from Toronto to Harare to London to Kingston find themselves often invisible. . . .

A painting depicting the landing of Christopher Columbus

Color Revolutions and Imperialism

Hong Kong, Ukraine, Belarus, Bolivia – these are the most recent examples of “protests” for “western-style” demokkkracy but the CIA has a very long history of creating such unrest in nations that go against the colonizer’s interests, especially in Pachamama (“south america”). These are called “Color Revolutions.” . . .

Sekou Ture and Mao Tse Tung

China, Africa(ns), White Supremacy & the White Left

For many in the white left, their conscious or unconscious embrace of white supremacy prevents them from recognizing how much those backward ideals influence their perception of China today. Their constant labeling of China as no different than European capitalist/imperialism is an example. . . .

African Financial Independence is a Threat to the Status Quo and not a Pipedream.

African Financial Independence is a Threat to Imperialism

The deeper issues are usually traced to colonial economic interactions and the introduction of capitalism in developing countries. There were concerted efforts to build and maintain economic relations, in which the colonies were made into permanent producers of raw materials to satisfy the requirements of metropolitan countries. The established links between the producers and the colonial metropoles meant that colonies became dependent on other countries to purchase and dictate the prices of products. Colonies, as a result, were left without the infrastructure to process the raw materials and only purchased ready-made goods from the associated colonial power. The result was that colonies produced what they did not consume and consumed what they did not produce. . . .