The poster for Diary of a Tired Black man. An African glares at an African man who is looking into the distance

The Absurdity of “Diary of a Tired Black Man”

There is an amazingly sad example of a program aired on the IMDB network called “Diary of a Tired Black Man.”  Part fiction, part documentary (street interviews with people), full insanity, this effort illustrated in clear terms Kwame Ture’s statement that any analysis that doesn’t include our enemies is a worthless analysis.  What he meant by that is any oppressed people who attempt to explain the conditions of their people who leave out the system causing their oppression will always come up with a confused conclusion. We wish to add our own attempt at a logical statement to Kwame’s spot . . .

A People's Program member at the People's Breakfast in Oakland, an example of a revolutionary as opposed to missionary program.

Are You a Missionary or a Revolutionary?

In a recent panel, Delency posed the question to his fellow panelists: “are you a missionary or a revolutionary?” The question naturally arose since the panel featured groups and people who are actively participating in food and community programs. Over the course of the discussion, it became clear that folks are engaged in the work for different reasons. Two members of People’s Programs (Yemi & Delency) participated in the panel and it was their goal to have an honest conversation with the other panelists (and themselves) about why they are doing this work: to make themselves feel good, or to . . .

Kwame Ture and comrades in Guinea

Why Did Kwame Ture Move to Africa?

On November 15th, 1998, Kwame Ture (formally Stokely Carmichael) made his physical transition.  I remember where I was when we received the news.  We were at Sacramento State University, early on a Sunday morning, preparing to begin our work study meeting when one of the members came in and made the announcement.  None of us were surprised.  Kwame had been ill with the prostate cancer that eventually took his life for quite some time.  I remember thinking things were about to change for all of us. [Over] Twenty years later, we have gone through major growing pains as an organization . . .

Huey Newton speaks at Boston college

Huey Newton, George Jackson & What They Mean to Us

This week is quite a historical week as it relates to the African liberation struggle within the confines of the colony known as the U.S. In August of 1971, George Jackson, who was incarcerated in California, was murdered inside prison walls there. As a response to his murder and oppressive prison conditions, incarcerated persons from all walks of life banded together at Attica Prison in New York and staged a rebellion that saw about 40 people slaughtered by prison officials and police. In August of 1989, Huey P. Newton, the co-founder of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, and . . .

Kwame Ture in front of an AAPRP banner and a picture of Sekou Toure

Exposing Police Lies to Destroy the Legacy of Kwame Ture

The capitalist system is not going to educate you about the true legacy of Kwame Ture because once you know it, you will become energized to carry out that legacy. The capitalist ruling classes understand clearly, even if we do not, that the day that consciousness takes hold is the day their time is numbered. . . .

The concept of Anti- Blackness is an invention of the African petit-bourgeois

Negritude; The Parent of So-called “Anti- Blackness”

Throughout African (Black) activist and social media circles today the concept of “anti-Blackness” is constantly presented as an explanation behind the suffering African people experience within this backward society. The logic of this thinking is summarized within the belief that our 529 years of suffering results from European-dominated culture disliking and disrespecting us due primarily to the fact we are different from them. Inherent in this thinking, whether expressed overtly or not, is the belief that Europeans possess some innate gene that pushes them to have this hatred of us. Also within this thought process (equally as overt and/or covert) is the belief among African people that there is really no escape from this sorry reality. . . .