Marcus Garvey at a UNIA, Ho Chi Minh exploring with friends

The Unknown Connection Between Marcus Garvey & Ho Chi Minh

If you possess even a cursory history of oppressed peoples, then you have undoubtedly heard of the great Vietnamese leader Ho Chi Minh and the outstanding Pan-Africanist Marcus Garvey.  Ho Chi Minh, who’s actual name was Nguyen Ai Quoc, was the founder and leader of the Viet Minh Front, which was the organized force of Vietnamese people that led their national liberation against colonial invading forces (including the U.S.) from the 1920s through the 1970s.  Marcus Garvey was the Jamaican born African who helped initiate and lead the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) which grew to be the largest liberation . . .

Albert Woodfox seated in a kitchen, smiling and holding a copy of his book Solitary.

Albert Woodfox, Angola Three Warrior, passes.

Who has not heard of the Angola Three, three young black prisoners who were falsely accused of killing a prison guard in 1972 in the infamous Louisiana maximum security prison cited at a former slave plantation—and named for the place where the African captives came from, Angola. On Thursday, August 4th, attorneys for Albert Woodfox announced his passing at the age of 75. For over 43 years, Woodfox and several other black men were held in brutal solitary confinement, one of the longest held solitary prisoners on earth: 43 years, seven days a week, 23 hours a day. The United . . .

WERD, which became America's first black-owned radio station in 1949, is now used as a space for Atlanta artists to perform on Wednesday nights.

Black Radio & the Struggle for Pan-Africanism

The 1960’s and 70’s proved itself a paramount time for Black Folks. Not since the beginning of the century with mass organization led by Marcus Garvey, had there been such great instituting towards a better future for Africans globally. In North America there was a rise in Black nationalism and racial pride, ultimately emphasizing the need for Power. Africans in the Caribbean and parts of South America participated in active armed struggles and insurrections against colonial supported governments. They fought strategically to dismantle the systems of economic subjugation that were based upon race. In Europe, Africans held mass demonstrations in . . .

Cuban propaganda celebrating revolutionary African women

Celebrating Revolutionary African Women

This month the editors of Hood Communist will be celebrate revolutionary African working class women and their contributions to the struggle for African liberation. To kick off the celebration, here are five revolutionary African women you should know. . . .

Africans protest racist conditions produced by Zionist in occupied Palestine.

Zionism’s Shrewd Manipulation of African Movements

Clearly, a movement based upon justice can never cut deals with the forces that oppress their people, especially when those deals are designed to increase repression against the people in order to hurry along a political objective. Yet that’s exactly what the zionist movement did and its what it continued to do by manipulating African movements for justice against white supremacy. . . .

Black History Month: From Negro History Week to Pan-African Historical Context

Originally published on The Black Commentator in 2008 “Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history.” – Carter G. Woodson “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots” – Marcus Garvey The need to once and for all embrace a reasonable and comprehensive interpretation of African history that inspires and uplifts Black people is evident when examining how Black History Month is celebrated in US culture. Like most other historic reflections, Black History Month is . . .