A meme depicting an African woman, labelled Africans in the US, carrying an African man, labelled Juneteenth. She is pointing two fingers at a European woman labelled capitalism and imperialism, warding her away.

Its Time For Us to Reclaim Juneteenth

The militancy of the Black Power movement and the overall emerging militancy of African and other colonized people signaled a change in our enemy’s approach. If you’ve been paying close attention to the tactics of the capitalist system over the last 25 years, you can see the trend. The mass movements of the past taught the capitalist system that their go-to reliance exclusively upon brutality and ironclad control is no longer a viable strategy. Make no mistake about it, of course, they still utilize brutality, and they always will, but they have made adjustments. They have learned the meaning of . . .

Black Alliance for Peace Haiti and the Americas Syllabus

Defending Our Americas: A Syllabus

What does it mean to defend our Americas? For the Black Alliance for Peace, defending our Americas begins with a re-drawing of the map of the Americas. No longer can the United States stand at the center of the hemisphere, upholding an eternal whiteness while imposing a suffocating capitalism. Instead, for BAP, Haiti is the center of the Americas. Solidarity with Haiti is key to the defense of the Americas. Haiti endures the original territory of Black emancipation from slavery, of Black independence from colonialism, and Black resistance to racism and global capitalism. Yet Haiti has also become the region’s . . .

Banner declaring May 25th is African Liberation Day, not Africa Day

African Liberation Day, Not Africa Day

Written by Nicholas Mwangi & Lewis Maghanga This year marks the 59th annual commemoration of African Liberation Day. African Liberation Day was founded in 1958 when Kwame Nkrumah convened the First Conference of Independent African States held in Accra, Ghana, and attended by eight independent African states. The 15th of April was declared “Africa Freedom Day,” to mark each year the onward progress of the liberation movement, and to symbolize the determination of the people of Africa to free themselves from foreign domination and exploitation. On the 25th of May 1963, thirty-one African Heads of state convened a summit meeting . . .

Shot from African Liberation Day organized by the Thomas Sankara Center in Burkina Faso

Neo-Colonialism is Inherently Patriarchal

I was asked to talk about women fighting for Pan-African unity against neo-colonialism but one of the things that came up on our call when I was preparing for this was neo-colonialism as an inherently patriarchal system of exploitation. So I want to begin by talking about the ways in which neo-colonialism is inherently patriarchal. As we may know, colonialism and neo-colonialism impact every facet of life for colonized peoples so there is no way to analyze any aspect of our lives while ignoring the reality of neo-colonialism and imperialism, but since neo-colonialism is fundamentally an economic system, I want . . .

A picture of Africa with two white hands reaching towards it. Text says African Liberation Day '22 and Smash Neo-Colonialism

African Liberation Day 2022: Smash Neo-Colonialism!

The age of classical colonialism in Africa changed the course of history. Exploited trade agreements and pseudo alliances between African nobility and European merchants led to heightened warfare, looting, and genocide across the continent. No mineral or raw material was safe, from gold to palm oil to diamonds. The transatlantic slave trade emptied the continent of capable hands, bodies, and minds to the tune of 12 million Africans. The developing European capitalist class burned their way across Africa from all sides, exploiting every contradiction and weakness they could find. Then came the 1884-85 Berlin Conference, which was an exercise in . . .

Photo of Affiong L. Affiong on the Liberation Archives template with text that reads "DINNER AT THE OBAMA INN"

Dining at the Obama Inn

ON 17 MAY, THE VENERABLE New York Times reported: “Mr. Obama will travel to Accra, the capital of Ghana, on July 10 for an overnight stop at the end of a trip that will first take him to Moscow to meet with Russian leaders and then Sardinia for the annual summit of the G8 powers. The president and Mrs. Obama look forward to strengthening the US relationship with one of our most trusted partners in sub-Saharan Africa, and to highlighting the critical role that sound governance and civil society play in promoting lasting development …” Yes, Obama-ists around the globe . . .

Founders of Black Lives Matter, Patrisse Cullors, Melinda Abdullah and Alicia Garza sit around a decadent brunch styled table to reflect on the state of the movement on the anniversary of the murder of George Floyd.

BLM, Patrisse Cullors & Others Who Leave The Train

Editors Note: In recent months, mainstream media has flooded our screens and timelines with breaking news reporting about the misgivings of Patrisse Cullors and the Black Lives Matter national organization. The reporting is salacious and sensational, appealing to our desires to take down the three we “always” knew were “traitors to our movement.” But in what is becoming a mass hysteria among the US African left, are we learning any lessons? By only focusing on the money and the scandal, and not the ideological contradictions that produced all the individualism, opportunism and dead-end strategy of the past decade, we ensure . . .

Liberation Archives: On Neocolonialism by Rafiki Morris

On Neo-colonialism

(Excepted from  the book, “WAR: The Blood in Our Eyes” by Rafiki Morris) The enemy, who we seek to defeat,  must be named precisely. Especially since, at this time in history, the enemy is the most sophisticated system of human exploitation that ever existed. The enemy is capitalism and imperialism.  We are told that people don’t understand this capitalism and imperialism, that dominates their lives. But nobody knows capitalism better than those who are exploited and dehumanized by it. The people know and understand the enemy, even when they cannot call them by name. What we must do is to  . . .