Liberation Archives: Shirley Graham Du Bois- The Mistake of the First African Summit Conference

The Mistake of the First African Summit Conference – Shirley Graham DuBois

This is an excerpt from a speech given by the great Shirely Graham DuBois at UCLA on November 13, 1970, almost a decade after the African Summit Conference in Ethiopia where Pan-Africanists from all over the world came together to sign the Charter of African Unity. You can listen to the section below here, or the entire speech here.  . . .

A pro-Russia demonstration in Mali. Africans opposed US foreign policy regarding the situation in Ukraine

Many Africans Reject Washington’s Position on Ukraine Crisis

Since the post-World War II period national liberation movements and independent countries in Africa have developed solid diplomatic and economic relations with the former Soviet Union and today’s Russian Federation. It is this history which underlines the refusal of numerous African governments and mass organizations to side with the United States and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in its efforts to encircle Russia in order to leave it as a diminished state dependent upon the dominant imperialist nations globally. . . .

Where is the empathy for these African refugees at the US-Mexico border

Imperialism and the Weaponization of Empathy

Empathy’s endurance among us says that a better and more just way of living is possible despite our current conditions and that the (re)building of that way of living is within our capacity. However, empathy, like almost every aspect of the psyche when we are disorganized and unconscious, can be weaponized and manipulated by that same genocidal global system. We are witnessing this today on a grand scale.  . . .

An woman in South Africa victimized by an abuser

Understanding Imperialism by Understanding Abuse

Imagine… and then recognize that the abused partner is experiencing the same things as the masses of those experiencing the effects of imperialism and (neo)colonialism. And they have fought, and continue to organize and fight for self determination. . . .

A NATO family photo

An Analysis on Ukraine/NATO conflict with Russia

This piece was originally published here by People’s Programs. Written by Abbas Muntaqim. amerikkka is the biggest threat to humanity and the planet. Through it’s evolution as a settler colonial regime that enslaved Afrikans and committed genocide against the indigenous peoples and Afrikans, it has become an imperialist power house. Waging wars from Iraq, to Vietnam, to Korea, to Africa. There is no bounds to amerikkkan imperialism. One might ask why I’m starting an article that is about the Ukraine (nato) vs Russian conflict, with the united states? Well, that’s because if you follow the money. If you follow the weapons. . . .

A picture of a destroyed city street in Libya, a north African nation invated by NATO

NATO in Africa: Colonial Violence and Structural White Supremacy

Considering the public media attention and concern about possible expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), it is worth reminding people about NATO’s bloody history in Africa. NATO was founded in 1949 after WWII at a time when African countries were still under the yoke of colonialism. In fact most of the original founders of NATO had been Africa’s principal colonizers such as UK, France, Portugal, Belgium, Italy and the USA as lead NATO organizer and dominant partner. The organization was established as a collective defense against the Soviet Union with the requirement (Article 5) that any attack on . . .

Display image for Hood Communist collective piece on African Liberation Month - the house is burning

The House Is Burning

As the African bourgeoisie gains more access to comforts and western privileges, the African masses continue to see a decline in their living standards. But Africa is a land that is ripe for revolution even when it can’t be immediately seen. . . .

Pan-Africanism will unite Africans across colonial borders.

Class Struggle and Freedom Beyond Colonial Borders

The global COVID-19 pandemic has brought into sharp relief how truly interconnected our world is, how superficial colonial borders are, and thus how the struggle for freedom must link localized organizing to broader global insurgencies. Of course, this is not new. Though our epoch offers unique challenges, problems, and articulations of the dialectic between repression and resistance, history doesn’t repeat itself—but it rhymes. . . .