US Vice President, Kamala Harris

Kamala Harris and The Americas

In March, the White House announced that Vice President Kamala Harris would take charge of the Biden administration’s “efforts to deter migration to the southwestern border by working to improve conditions in Central America”,  comprising the nations of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Harris’ tour of the Northern Triangle of Central America (NTCA) allows her the opportunity to advance on the world stage as a “clean up woman” after the exposure of the Biden administration’s continuation of migrants in cages and child separations at the US-Mexico border. The idea behind the tour is to establish some understanding between leaders on . . .

Members of the ADOS movement

A Dose of Reality for the #ADOS Movement

To a certain extent, it is understandable why Black folks in the ADOS movement want something that caters specifically to African-Americans’ material conditions. However, to exclude non-American Africans from the fight for reparations is not only counter-productive but ahistorical. . . .

Feminism & Women’s Liberation Are Not Imperialist

In modern-day politics, figures such as Meghan Markle, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Michelle Obama, and Kamala Harris are seen as heroes of our times who have overcome the odds in order to make the world a better place for women everywhere. By taking up space in male-dominated settings, they are sending the message that they’re a force to be reckoned with. Powerful. Commanding. In control. However, this doesn’t automatically mean that they’re making progress on behalf of women everywhere. . . .

Pictures of Somali at a protest.

The Historical Roots of the Somali Election Crisis

Elections in the Somali capital of Muqdisho have been delayed due to disagreements between the President and the opposition – a coalition of regional governors and prominent national politicians, including the recently removed premier and two former presidents. This essay argues that the recurring political crisis between different ruling-class factions and between Muqdisho and the provinces has its roots not in the ideological afterlives of a pre-colonial ‘tribal’ mode of living – as per the dominant narrative, but in the country’s integration into the global capitalist-imperialist system since the late 19th century, and especially since the neoliberal recolonisation of the country in the aftermath of the 1977–78 Ogaden War. . . .

Joe Biden looking slightly sad, perhaps contemplating the passive revolution..

Joe Biden and the ‘Passive Revolution’

Though it appears that Biden has pulled off a revival of centrism amid an ‘organic crisis’, his honeymoon period will be short-lived as there is a crisis of legitimacy of the ideas, institutions, and coalitions that undergird U.S. neoliberal capitalism. During moments like this, the ruling class may attempt what Gramsci called a ‘passive revolution’ – implementing symbolic or limited change from above without fundamentally transforming social relations – to restore its hegemony and stave off challenges to its position within society. Key parts of this process include the co-optation of demands from below, new political coalitions, paying lip service . . .

“The threat comes from the neoliberal Right”

Originally published on Kosmodromio who spoke with Ajamu Baraka, human rights defender whose experience spans thirty years of domestic and international education and activism, national coordinator of the Black Peace Alliance (BAP) and US vice-presidential nominee of the Green Party of the United States for the 2016 election. A few days after the elections how would you describe the political landscape in the US today? Cause here in Europe there is the feeling that America remains deeply polarized. What Donald Trump’s defeat and Joe Biden’s victory means for the American people? It remains to be seen in practice what truth . . .

The Comfortable Ones

This poem is for the comfortable ones. For the bureaucrats who exist to insure their existence. For the civil servants who are not civil and do not serve. For the teachers who teach what to think but don’t know how to think. For the policeman who serve capital and protect property. For the doctors selling health, the lawyers selling justice, and the politicians selling their souls. For the upwardly mobile, down pressing, respectable, well mannered, individualist. For the use-to-bees, claim-to-bees, and wanna-bees. This poem -is for the wealthy ones. For their peace absent justice, structurally adjusted, debt servicing, payment balancing, . . .