Mali, Burkina Faso, and Niger at the head of the African Revolution

History is a great teacher. If we do not learn from it, we are doomed to repeat mistakes made. Early post-colonial African leaders such as Kwame Nkrumah, Sekou Toure, Modibo Keita and Marien Ngouabi spoke of economic independence and the ongoing struggle for true independence. Well aware of the trap of bogus independence, what Walter Rodney referred to as “brief- case independence”, or what I refer to as “flag-and-anthem independence”, these leaders mobilised and organised their people for the completion of their respective national liberation struggles. However, Western imperialism and its stooges, or “running dogs of imperialism”, as the Chinese . . .

Rastafarianism In the Shadow of “Pan-African” Music Trends

Ghana police or koti if that’s your thing, and Rastafarianism don’t mix well. One has peace of mind, and the other is trying to maintain the “peace” through any means. I first took notice of this whilst overhearing the stories of the police raids of this or that rasta house, always a marijuana violation, and always short on the devilish details of what Rastas were up to (probably just meditating or vibing). But really and truly all Ghanaians know that the police, if they were indeed getting paid fairly, had better things to do. In fact all Africans will agree . . .

Mawina Kouyate: A Pan-African Comrade

WHO IS MAWINA KOUYATE? A name synonymous with Mother Africa was born in Boston, Massachusetts in the United States of America on 31st March 1941. For 40 good years of her life, Comrade Mawina Kouyate had been an exemplary revolutionary in international, Pan-African and community movements. Comrade Mawina’s early work began in organising women around tenants and welfare rights in her birthplace of Boston. Comrade Mawina attained the height of her revolutionary work when she joined the All-African people’s Revolutionary Party (A-APRP) in the 1970s, after having been influenced by the work, recruitment and organisation of the Party militants led . . .

Revolution in the Sahel?

Military Coups in Guinea, Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger On July 26, 2023 in a military coup d’etat, the National Council for the Safeguard of the Homeland (CNSP) ousted Niger president Mohamed Bazoum and took control of the country. This followed recent coups in  Burkina Faso, Guinea-Conakry, Mali, and Chad. These countries are bound together by the Sahel, a semi-arid region on the edge of the Sahara desert that stretches from the Atlantic ocean in the west and to the Red Sea in the east. The Sahel region suffers from a number of complex factors resulting from French political and . . .

Nigeria Will Become A Liberated Zone

The bus driver, the shop keeper, as well as the farmer are all aware of the many ways the Nigerian government is depriving its citizens of the means of realizing their potential in terms of development, and self-actualization. Nigeria as an institution is not working in favor of the people within its apparent territory. The proletariat of the country is well aware of the government’s failings but do not always make the connection to the larger problem of neocolonial capitalism. The average person experiences these issues through inflation, and while that is a magical economic term for many including myself, . . .

The Ethiopia in Question

Abiy Ahmed’s accidental rise to power and reign demonstrates the typical politician capitalizing on opportunity in the midst of chaos, the difference in this instance is that Ahmed’s actions and inactions have evolved Ethiopia’s once political crisis into straight oblivion.  . . .

Message to the Colonized: Remarks at ALD 2023

Peace Peace Africans! I’d like to thank the Maryland Council of Elders for organizing another wonderful African Liberation Day event and I like to thank Sister Abena for inviting me another year to gift books to children and also speak on behalf of Black Alliance For Peace. My name is Erica Caines and I wear many hats in the Black Alliance For Peace, which is an alliance that seeks to recapture and redevelop the historic anti-war, anti-imperialist, and pro-peace positions of the radical black movement. African Liberation Day has been my favorite time of year since I have been invited . . .