US Vice President, Kamala Harris

Kamala Harris and The Americas

In March, the White House announced that Vice President Kamala Harris would take charge of the Biden administration’s “efforts to deter migration to the southwestern border by working to improve conditions in Central America”,  comprising the nations of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Harris’ tour of the Northern Triangle of Central America (NTCA) allows her the opportunity to advance on the world stage as a “clean up woman” after the exposure of the Biden administration’s continuation of migrants in cages and child separations at the US-Mexico border. The idea behind the tour is to establish some understanding between leaders on . . .

Ethiopia: How to Wreck A Black Nation In The Age Of “Black Lives Matter”

Having spent much time navigating my way through the twilight zone that is American Foreign Policy, I feel compelled to share with you all how the cynical (but very real) game of sabotaging and undermining a large African country is played while loudly proclaiming that Black Lives Matter. . . .

An African holds a sign that says "Black Lives Matter"

The Politician

The Politician is our organizer, activist, and freedom fighter. She is our mother, daughter, sibling, and compatriot. She walks behind, beside, and in front of us. She sets the pace and brings up the rear. She claims to be a servant, but we know her as much more than a servant of the people. She is our light in the dark. She illuminates the path we follow. . . .

The aftermath of the massacre in Tulsa that later became known as the destruction of Black Wall Street.

From Black Wall Street to Black Capitalism

Universalizing Blackness as a flat experience allows Amazon to proclaim #BlackLivesMatter, create a Black-owned business page but crush the unions organized by its Black workers. It allows the NBA to paint BLM on its hardwoods, highlight Black business during the NBA finals but pay its predominantly Black and temp workers dirt wages. Universalizing Blackness distorts Blackness itself. It is decorating at its worst. . . .

The USA – Irrelevant to Africa’s Liberation Struggle

For many Black political activists – from some of the most committed bourgeois Democratic Party stalwarts to some of the most revolutionary socialists – there is a widespread commitment to achieving political aspirations, if not within the current system, at least within North America. However, if what we face in this country goes beyond racial tensions and discrimination and is instead a state of war, then plans for freedom or liberation in the U.S. are grounded in self-delusion. . . .

A Palestinian woman reacts as she carries a toddler, while Jewish settlers move out the belongings of a Palestinian family from a house in the east Jerusalem neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah, Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2009. In an unrest Tuesday, a Jewish family took over a house in an Arab neighborhood of east Jerusalem, sparking a protest by rock-throwing Palestinians and a few Israeli and foreign activists who joined them, police said. One of the family members was lightly injured in the head when a protester hit him with a metal bar, and police arrested five people. Both sides claim ownership of the building. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)

What is Palestine to the U.S.

By Mumia Abu-Jamal For some, this may come as a surprise, for it seems illogical, but the U.S. doesn’t hate Palestine. It arms and finances its nemesis, Israel – yes. It votes consistently with Israel in the United Nations (UN) – even against the majority of the world’s nations -yes. It quietly and surreptitiously allowed Israel to become a nuclear power – yes. All this is true; but the U.S. doesn’t hate Palestine. The truth is something far worse, for dismissal is more damning than hatred. Palestine, its people, its history, its culture, its art, its poetry, its very land, . . .

Members of the ADOS movement

A Dose of Reality for the #ADOS Movement

To a certain extent, it is understandable why Black folks in the ADOS movement want something that caters specifically to African-Americans’ material conditions. However, to exclude non-American Africans from the fight for reparations is not only counter-productive but ahistorical. . . .